Naloxone: An important tool, but not the solution to the opioid crisis

In this study, we aimed to define how many patients who were treated with naloxone by an ambulance crew and initially survived were still alive after one year. Even though these patients are typically just observed in the ED hallway, allowed to sober while the ED staff is busy taking care of other patients with life-threatening emergencies like heart attacks, trauma, and strokes, our team hypothesized that the individual sobering in the hallway bed has perhaps one of the highest one-year mortality rates of anyone seen in the department. Here’s how the study worked — and what we found To perform the study, we took advantage of a special project in Massachusetts called the “Chapter 55” legislation which, for the first time, linked many previously separate state databases. We connected the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) database with the all-payer claims database and death records database for our study. In brief, we evaluated patients who received naloxone by EMS over a 30-month period. We then looked at death records one year beyond the first time they received naloxone. During the study period, there were 12,192 naloxone administrations by EMS, which equals over 400 per month. Of these, 6.5% of patients died that same day and 9.3% died within one year. Excluding those who died the same day, about 10% of the patients who initially survived were dead at one year. Even more significant was that 51.4% of those patients died within one month. Also, apart ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Health naloxone Source Type: blogs

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Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Is Cocaine Addictive? According to the Foundation for a Drug Free World, cocaine creates the greatest psychological dependence of any drug, next to methamphetamine. It stimulates key pleasure centers within the brain and causes extremely heightened euphoria. Cocaine addiction, tolerance and dependency builds quickly. If someone uses cocaine, they will not get the same effect as the very next time they do it with the same amount. Understanding Cocaine Cocaine is a white, powdery substance. It creates a high by reacting with the body’s central nervous system, releasing high amounts of dopamine. In turn, this creates en...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Cocaine Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Substance Abuse cocaine addiction coke drug addiction drug addiction recovery drug addiction treatment Source Type: blogs
Sandra Maddock, president &CEO of IMARC Research With new technology and groundbreaking medical device news making headlines every day, there has never been a more exciting time to be involved in clinical research. So much is changing so fast — faster than at any other time in the history of clinical research. At IMARC Research, we take pride in innovation. We’re constantly monitoring medical device trends and regulatory updates to determine how they might apply to the clinical research teams who enlist our oversight. We know this will be a transformational year, so we’re excited to kick off 2019...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Blog IMARC Source Type: news
As an athlete, I think regularly about the potential health benefits of exercise for my patients. Every week, I treat patients hospitalized at Brigham and Women’s Hospital with significant medical problems that are a direct result of severe addiction, ranging from seizures and strokes to heart valve and joint infections. I also care for outpatients at the Brigham and Women’s Faulkner Hospital Addiction Recovery Program. In both settings, I provide medication-assisted treatment (MAT) such as buprenorphine-naloxone for opioid use disorder, and extended-release naltrexone for both alcohol use disorder and opioid u...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Exercise and Fitness Health Source Type: blogs
Alcohol content measuring wristbands, smart lighters, nicotine tracking wearables, stop smoking apps, virtual reality therapies, automated messaging platforms are the newest elements in the arsenal of digital health technologies supporting everyone in the fight against addiction to cigarettes, alcohol or drugs. Addiction and dependency ruins lives Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life. It doesn’t matter whether it’s about cigarettes, alcohol, medication, drugs, gambling, sex, etc., any of these substances or phenomena could cause you strong dependency and might impact you...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Future of Pharma Medical Professionals Patients Researchers alcohol cigarette digital health drugs health technology Innovation medication opioid opioid crisis smartphone smartphone apps smoking virtual Source Type: blogs
The number of people hospitalized because of amphetamine use is skyrocketing in the United States, but the resurgence of the drug largely has been overshadowed by the nation’s intense focus on opioids. Amphetamine-related hospitalizations jumped by about 245% from 2008 to 2015, according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. That dwarfs the rise in hospitalizations from other drugs, such as opioids, which were up by about 46%. The most significant increases were in Western states. The surge in hospitalizations and deaths due to amphetamines “is just totally off the radar,” ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight September is National Preparedness Month. Disasters Happen. Prepare Now. Learn How. This week: Save for an Emergency. The MAReport: the Summer/Fall 2018 issue of the MAReport newsletter is now available! This quarter, Education &Healthy Literacy Coordinator Michelle Burda is challenging YOU to raise health literacy awareness in your library, organization or community! Check out her article on Health Literacy Month for tools and resources you can use to promote health literacy during the month of October, and all year lo...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) like naproxen are and have been the go-to “benign” pain medication for doctors and patients alike. Why? They aren’t addictive, and it’s not easy to overdose. Serious side effects like gastrointestinal ulcers and bleeding seemed to be limited to high doses taken for longer periods or time, or to people with significant medical problems. Even before the era of the opioid epidemic, it was raining NSAIDs, across the country. In 2004, the manufacturer of the NSAID Vioxx pulled it from the market because the drug was associated with serious...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Drugs and Supplements Headache Health Heart Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
One of the federal government's important roles is to take on our county's most pressing issues and respond with solutions on a national scale. Responsible for killing nearly 50,000 people in 2014 alone, the opioid epidemic is clearly a crisis our country needs a sweeping and effective government response to overcome. What tools does the federal government have in its pocket that can combat the opioid epidemic, and how can we be sure that they'll work? Where national agencies can alter their policies to support opioid addiction treatment and prevention, they are doing so. In March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prev...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Deadlier than Ever Before: Here’s How the Federal Government is Fighting Back Against the Opioid Epidemic One of the federal government’s important roles is to take on our county’s most pressing issues and respond with solutions on a national scale. Responsible for killing nearly 50,000 people in 2014 alone, the opioid epidemic is clearly a crisis our country needs a sweeping and effective response to overcome. What tools does the federal government have in its pocket that can combat the opioid epidemic, and how can we be sure that they’ll work? Where national agencies can alter their policies to su...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Abuse Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcoholism Behavioral Addictions Current Events Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Mental Health addiction treatment center alcohol ab Source Type: blogs
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