A New Gimish Model of Complex Disease?

By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD The appeal of precision medicine is the promise that we can understand disease with greater specificity and fashion treatments that are more individualized and more effective. A core tenet (or “central dogma,” as I wrote in 2015) of precision medicine is the idea that large disease categories – like type 2 diabetes – actually consist of multiple discernable subtypes, each with its own distinct characteristics and genetic drivers. As genetic and phenotypic research advances, the argument goes, diseases like “type 2 diabetes” will go the way of quaint descriptive diagnoses like “dropsy” (edema) and be replaced by more precisely defined subgroups, each ideally associated with a distinct therapy developed for that population. In 2015, this represented an intuitively appealing idea in search of robust supporting data (at least outside oncology). In 2017, this represents an intuitively appealing idea in search of robust supporting data (at least outside oncology). The gap between theory and data has troubled many researchers, and earlier this year, a pair of cardiologists from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Broad Institute, Sek Kathiresan and Amit V. Khera, wrote an important – and I’d suggest underappreciated – commentary in the journal Circulation that examined this very disconnect, through the lens of coronary artery disease (CAD). (Disclosures: I’m Chi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Broad Institute CAD Circulation Disease Categories Gimish Model of Disease Kathiresan Khera Massachussetts General Hospital Source Type: blogs

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Conclusions Overall, a majority of patients recovered well postoperatively with minimal complications and low rate of reoperation. Our research provides a foundation to develop a risk-stratified approach to determine the need for an ICU admission or early transfer to floor care.
Source: Annals of Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Microsurgery Source Type: research
Conclusions A more precise definition of contamination and infection has to be made in guidelines, which may lead the first group to be treated without extraction. Surgical method defined in this study can be used for the treatment of patients in contaminated CIED subgroup, conserving individuals from risks of device extraction.
Source: Annals of Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Reconstructive Surgery Source Type: research
Conclusions Supporting the mechanisms of NO bioavailability via exogenous application of iNOS and L-arginine significantly attenuated I/R-induced alterations in a skin flap rat model. This pharmacologic preconditioning could be an easy and effective interventional strategy to uphold conversation of L-arginine to NO even on ischemic and type 1 diabetic conditions.
Source: Annals of Plastic Surgery - Category: Cosmetic Surgery Tags: Research Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our primary study suggests that PSMC2 might be involved in the progression of pancreatic cancer and may serve as a potential therapeutic target.
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Conclusion: We confirmed the distinct STING expression in CRC and demonstrated its independent prognostic value in survival outcomes. STING could be a potential therapeutic target that enhances anti-cancer immune response in CRC.
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Uveal melanoma (UM) is an aggressive cancer which has a high percentage of metastasis and with a poor prognosis. Identifying the potential prognostic markers of uveal melanoma may provide information for early detection of metastasis and treatment. In this work, we analyzed 80 uveal melanoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We developed an 18-gene signature which can significantly predict the prognosis of UM patients. Firstly, we performed a univariate Cox regression analysis to identify significantly prognostic genes in uveal melanoma (P
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Synaptotagmin12 (SYT12) has been well characterized as the regulator of transmitter release in the nervous system, however the relevance and molecular mechanisms of SYT12 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) are not understood. In the current study, we investigated the expression of SYT12 and its molecular biological functions in OSCC by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunoblot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. SYT12 were up-regulated significantly in OSCC-derived cell lines and primary OSCC tissue compared with the normal counterparts (P
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Conclusions: TGFBI overexpression can promote OSCC and is associated with poor prognosis in OSCC patients. TGFBI knockout can inhibit cell proliferation and metastasis in vivo. TGFBI may alter cell responses to bacteria, which causes an imbalance in the immune inflammatory response and promotes the development of OSCC.
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Overexpression of AKR1B10 correlated with tumorigenesis of many human malignancies; however, the prognostic value of AKR1B10 expression in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) still remains controversial. In this analysis, AKR1B10 expression in HCC tumors were evaluated in GEO, TCGA and Oncomine databases, and a survival analysis of AKR1B10 based on TCGA profile was performed. We found that AKR1B10 was significantly overexpressed in tumors compared with nontumors in 7 GEO series (GSE14520, GSE25097, GSE33006, GSE45436, GSE55092, GSE60502, GSE77314) and TCGA profile (all P
Source: Journal of Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD The appeal of precision medicine is the promise that we can understand disease with greater specificity and fashion treatments that are more individualized and more effective. A core tenet (or “central dogma,” as I wrote in 2015) of precision medicine is the idea that large disease categories – like type 2 diabetes – actually consist of multiple discernable subtypes, each with its own distinct characteristics and genetic drivers. As genetic and phenotypic research advances, the argument goes, diseases like “type 2 diabetes” will go the way of quaint descriptive...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized Broad Institute CAD Circulation Disease Categories Gimish Model of Disease Kathiresan Khera Massachussetts General Hospital Source Type: blogs
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