Heart attack deaths to rise as obesity EPIDEMIC takes hold of UK

DEATHS from heart attacks and strokes could rise as Britain ’s obesity epidemic takes its toll.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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In conclusion, older adults exhibited decreased markers of UPR activation and reduced coordination with autophagy and SC-associated gene transcripts following a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise. In contrast, young adults demonstrated strong coordination between UPR genes and key regulatory gene transcripts associated with autophagy and SC differentiation in skeletal muscle post-exercise. Taken together, the present findings suggest a potential age-related impairment in the post-exercise transcriptional response that supports activation of the UPR and coordination with other exercise responsive pathways (i.e....
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are the leading cause of premature death and disability in humans and their incidence is on the rise globally. Given their substantial contribution towards the escalating costs of health care, they also generate a high socio-economic burden in the general population. The underlying pathogenesis and progression associated with nearly all CVDs is predominantly of atherosclerotic origin that leads to the development of coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, venous thromboembolism and, peripheral vascular disease, subsequently causing myocardial infarction, cardiac ar...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
In conclusion, the impaired in situ activity of RyR2 may also account for the poor overall cardiac outcome reported in MetS patients; hence, the SERCA pump and RyR2 are both attractive potential targets for future therapies. Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of biochemical and physiological risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2); it represents a severe public health problem around the world (Alberti et al., 2009). Risk factors for MetS include obesity (particularly central obesity), elevated triglyceride (TG) levels, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
Sound, rhythm, rate, structure, function – countless features of the heart are measured to keep it healthy for as long as possible. Recently, an army of digital health technologies joined the forces of traditional preventive tools in cardiology to counter stroke, heart attack, heart failure or any other cardiovascular risks. In the future, minuscule sensors, digital twins, and artificial intelligence could strengthen their ranks. Let’s see what the future of cardiology might look like! Fitness trackers, chatbots and A.I. against heart disease Let’s say 36-year-old Maria living in Sao Paulo in 2033 d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Portable Diagnostics cardiology cardiovascular cardiovascular diseases digital digital twin health trackers heart heart health heart rate heart soun Source Type: blogs
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet beverages and vascular disease, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage or another hidden health issue. “Postmenopausal women tend to have higher risk for vascular disease because they are lacking the protective effects of natural hormones,” North Carolina cardiologist Dr. Kevin Campbell said, which could contribute to increased risk for heart disease and stroke...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Attack Stroke Source Type: news
This study, as well as other research on the connection between diet beverages and vascular disease, is observational and cannot show cause and effect. That’s a major limitation, researchers say, as it’s impossible to determine whether the association is due to a specific artificial sweetener, a type of beverage or another hidden health issue. “Postmenopausal women tend to have higher risk for vascular disease because they are lacking the protective effects of natural hormones,” North Carolina cardiologist Dr. Kevin Campbell said, which could contribute to increased risk for heart disease and stroke...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News CNN Heart Attack Stroke Source Type: news
Aspirin is once again in the headlines, prompted by New England Journal of Medicine reports suggesting that people aged 70 years and older obtain no benefit and perhaps experience harm in the form of increased bleeding and increased death from cancer on low-dose aspirin. This adds to the decades-long debate on whether aspirin is beneficial as a preventive measure against cardiovascular events such as heart attack in which a blood clot forms on top of inflamed atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. Unlike many other studies that are observational and therefore virtually useless, these studies are prospective and r...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates aspirin coronary grain-free heart attack heart disease Inflammation platelets Weight Loss wheat belly Source Type: blogs
This study indicates that frailty and other age-related diseases could be prevented and significantly reduced in older adults. Getting our heart risk factors under control could lead to much healthier old ages. Unfortunately, the current obesity epidemic is moving the older population in the wrong direction, however our study underlines how even small reductions in risk are worthwhile." The study analysed data from more than 421,000 people aged 60-69 in both GP medical records and in the UK Biobank research study. Participants were followed up over ten years. The researchers analysed six factors that could impa...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
By KIP SULLIVAN Managed care advocates see quality problems everywhere and resource shortages nowhere. If the Leapfrog Group, the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, or some other managed care advocate were in charge of explaining why a high school football team lost to the New England Patriots, their explanation would be “poor quality.” If a man armed with a knife lost a fight to a man with a gun, ditto: “Poor quality.” And their solution would be more measurement of the “quality,” followed by punishment of the losers for getting low grades on the “quality” report card and...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CMS Kip Sullivan value-based care Source Type: blogs
An excerpt from Physician—Time to Invest in Yourself: Work-Life Balance, the Needs of the Patient, and Medical-Legal Risk Management. With advances in biotechnology, the average life expectancy is significantly longer today than in the past. As practicing cardiologists, we observe firsthand that even though there are artificial means to prolong our patients’ lives, they are still prematurely aging at an alarming rate. Many are sedentary, overweight, deconditioned, and apathetic. Consequently, they experience heart attacks, strokes, musculoskeletal injuries, cancers, and premature death. The soaring healthc...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs
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