Lateralization effects on functional connectivity of the auditory network in patients with unilateral pulsatile tinnitus as detected by functional MRI

In this study, we recruited 23 left-sided, 23 right-sided PT (LSPT, RSPT) patients and 23 normal controls (NC). We combined applied independent component analysis and seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analysis to investigate alteration feature of the FC of the AN by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Compared with NC, LSPT patients demonstrated disconnected FC within the AN on both sides. Disrupted network integrity between AN and several brain functional networks, including executive control network, self-perceptual network and the limbic network, was also demonstrated in LSPT patient group bilaterally. In contrast, compared with NC, RSPT demonstrated decreased FC within the AN on the left side, but significant increased FC within the AN on the right side (symptomatic side). Enhanced FC between AN and executive control network, self-perceptual network and limbic network was also found mainly on the right side in patients with RSPT. Positive FC between the auditory network and the limbic network may be a reason to explain why RSPT patients are willing to be in the clinic. Briefly, LSPT exhibit disrupted network integrity in brain functional networks. But RSPT is featured by enhanced FC within AN and between networks, especially on the right (symptomatic) side. Corroboration of featured FC helps to reveal the pathophysiological changing process of the brain in patients with PT, providing imaging-based biomarker to distinguish PT from oth...
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: The diagnosis of mastoiditis is primarily clinical. An incidental finding of high signalling in the mastoid region on magnetic resonance imaging is highly unlikely to represent actual clinical disease. In patients who are scanned for other reasons and who do not complain of otological symptoms, such findings are unlikely to require otolaryngology input. PMID: 30392474 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Laryngol Otol Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Dural arteriovenous fistula is an uncommon intracranial vascular malformation rarely seen by otolaryngologists, with pulsatile tinnitus being the usual presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of dural arteriovenous fistula presenting with conductive hearing loss and otalgia. PMID: 30322412 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Laryngol Otol Source Type: research
J Neurol Surg B DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1675175 Objectives Although vestibular schwannomas (VS) are known to cause cranial nerve deficits, cerebellar symptoms, and hydrocephalus, the role of these symptoms as the key driver of presentation from the patient's perspective has not been described. Our objective was to survey a large, retrospective VS cohort to document the patient-reported principal initial symptom, and self-reported tumor size, and to study trends in VS patient presentation. Methods Patients diagnosed with VS at our tertiary referral center and belonging to the Acoustic Neuroma Association (ANA) a...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part B: Skull Base - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
We present the case of a 34-year-old woman, who presented to our department with a 4 months history of dizziness, hearing loss, and tinnitus on the right side. MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan demonstrated a large extra-axial lesion, suggestive of a meningioma, with dural attachments to the petrosal bone surface and tentorium, closely related with the trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibulocochlear, and lower cranial nerves in the right side. Treatment options were discussed with the patient, and surgical resection was selected to remove the lesion, and decompress the cranial nerves and brainstem. The surgery was perf...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part B: Skull Base - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Skull Base: Operative Videos Source Type: research
J Neurol Surg B DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1669973Meningiomas are the second most common neoplasm in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA), and are challenging lesions to treat surgically. With significant refinements in surgical techniques, operative morbidity, and mortality have been substantially reduced. Total or near-total surgical resection can be accomplished in the majority of cases via appropriately selected approaches, and with acceptable morbidity. In this video, we present a 51-year-old woman, who had a 2-year history of vertigo with symptoms that progressed over time. She presented with blurry vision, sensorineural hearin...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part B: Skull Base - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Skull Base: Operative Videos Source Type: research
J Neurol Surg B DOI: 10.1055/s-0038-1669969Infratentorial ependymomas that arise in the fourth ventricle and extend into the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) through the foramina of Luschka are well described. However, a primary CPA location of an ependymoma is distinctly uncommon. In this video, we present a 46-year-old man with episodes of dizziness, left-sided tinnitus, imbalance, double vision, and nausea. An magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the head showed a large mass lesion centered in the CPA with heterogenous enhancement. Differential diagnosis included ependymoma, meningioma, schwannoma of the vestibular nerv...
Source: Journal of Neurological Surgery Part B: Skull Base - Category: Neurosurgery Authors: Tags: Skull Base: Operative Videos Source Type: research
ConclusionComprehensive neurotological workup results in diagnoses that would go unrecognized otherwise, allowing patients to receive prompt treatment for medically important conditions, some of which may be causally related to their neurotologic complaints. However, the value of each study for routine testing of patients with neurotologic complaints remains controversial; and the evidence presented herein should help practitioners determine what studies should be included in his/her patient assessment.
Source: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Patients with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and/or unilateral tinnitus can be safely screened for acoustic neuroma and independently managed by audiologists as a first or only point of contact, resulting in considerable departmental cost savings. PMID: 30198461 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: J Laryngol Otol Source Type: research
ConclusionRegional atrophy of the amygdala may indicate self-modulation of emotional response regulation to diminish tinnitus-related emotional distress. Thalamic regional expansion may signify dysfunctional auditory gating in the thalamus, where inhibition of the tinnitus signal at the thalamus level is disrupted due to abnormal changes in the limbic system, ultimately leading to the tinnitus percept.
Source: Neuroradiology - Category: Radiology Source Type: research
We describe a 77-year-old man with spontaneous concurrent spinal and cranial SDHs, in whom the spinal SDH was identified 30 days before the intracranial chronic SDH. Diagnosis: Magnetic resonance imaging showed a spinal SDH at L4/L5. There was no paralysis, and the patient was managed conservatively. About 30 days after the onset of back pain, he experienced tinnitus and visual hallucination. Brain computed tomography showed a chronic SDH and midline shift. Interventions: Burr-hole evacuation was performed, and the patient's condition improved. Outcomes: At 5 months of follow-up, there was no recurrence of the spi...
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Research Article: Clinical Case Report Source Type: research
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