Heart rate variability: A new way to track well-being

Information is knowledge, and big tech companies know how important it is to collect and track data. When it comes to your health, it is now easy to measure and track all kinds of information. In the comfort of our homes we can check our weight, blood pressure, number of steps, calories, heart rate, and blood sugar. Recently some researchers have started to use an interesting marker for resilience and behavioral flexibility. It is called heart rate variability (HRV). Have you ever wondered what the health impact of a stressful day was? Will you perform well during your long run tomorrow morning? Is there anything you can do today that would improve your ability to have a better day moving forward? HRV may be the piece of data that could help you answer these questions. What is HRV? HRV is simply a measure of the variation in time between each heartbeat. This variation is controlled by a primitive part of the nervous system called the autonomic nervous system (ANS). It works regardless of our desire and regulates, among other things, our heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, and digestion. The ANS is subdivided into two large components, the sympathetic and the parasympathetic nervous system, also known as the fight-or-flight mechanism and the relaxation response. The brain is constantly processing information in a region called the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus, through the ANS, sends signals to the rest of the body either to stimulate or to relax different functions. It re...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Exercise and Fitness Prevention Source Type: blogs

Related Links:

Publication date: Available online 2 June 2020Source: European Journal of Obstetrics &Gynecology and Reproductive BiologyAuthor(s): Sabine Moehner, Kerstin Becker, Jens A. Lange, Sophia von Stockum, Klaas Heinemann
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ABSTRACT Objective To assess the outcome of an educational nutritional intervention in the quality of diet of women with breast cancer in adjuvant treatment. Methods Women with breast cancer and admitted for surgical treatment were divided in an intervention group (n=18) and a comparison group (n=78), and participated in a nonrandomized clinical trial. Participants were assessed before and after the treatment and/or intervention. A food frequency questionnaire was applied and the quality of diet was calculated using the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised. The educational nutritional intervention lasted 12 months and wa...
Source: Revista de Nutricao - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 June 2020Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular DiseasesAuthor(s): Tingjing Zhang, Shanshan Bian, Yeqing Gu, Ge Meng, Qing Zhang, Li Liu, Hongmei Wu, Shunming Zhang, Yawen Wang, Xuena Wang, Xingqi Cao, Huiping Li, Yunyun Liu, Xiaoyue Li, Xiaohe Wang, Shaomei Sun, Xing Wang, Ming Zhou, Huanli Jiao, Qiyu Jia
Source: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Source: BMJ Comments - Category: General Medicine Source Type: forums
Publication date: Available online 2 June 2020Source: Journal of ColoproctologyAuthor(s): Nasrin Sarabi
Source: Journal of Coloproctology - Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: research
Fractyl Laboratories is seeking to ‘turn back the clock’ in Type 2 diabetes progression with its disease-modifying therapy. FDA granted the Lexington, MA-based company IDE to launch a pivotal trial of the Revita DMR, a which holds the potential to eliminate the need for insulin injections in patients suffering from Type 2 diabetes. “Insulin is a challenging drug for patients with Type 2 diabetes because it can cause weight gain,” Harith Rajagopalan M.D. Ph.D., co-founder and CEO of Fractyl told MD+DI. “It can cause a risk of your bloo...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Implants Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news
This study had a large sample size and obtained positive findings in both patients’ subjective ratings and in inflammatory marker levels. It demonstrates the benefits of adding Tai Chi to an antidepressant regimen but does not examine the specific effect of Tai Chi on depression.Field et al. (16) investigated the effects of combined Tai Chi/yoga in 92 prenatally depressed pregnant women. They found that women practicing Tai Chi/yoga (20 min per week for 12 weeks) had lower depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance scores compared to a waitlist control group (Table 1). This study had a large sample size and provided ...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Poor sleep is bad for your heart AND your brain! An article about poor sleep and the build-up of plaque in the body caught my eye. The study is remarkable in that it is the first study: “to show that objectively measured sleep is independently associated with atherosclerosis throughout the body,” according to José Ordovás, director of nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. More about that in a moment. What really caught my attention was further down in the article: A lab-based research study tied the lack of sleep with severe cog...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Heart Disease Risk Factors Heart Health Stress Management Sleep and heart health Source Type: blogs
Publication date: 2016 Source:International Review of Neurobiology, Volume 127 Author(s): A.I. Vinik, C. Casellini, M.-L. Névoret Here we review some seldom-discussed presentations of diabetic neuropathy, including large fiber dysfunction and peripheral autonomic dysfunction, emphasizing the impact of sympathetic/parasympathetic imbalance. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes and contributes additional risks in the aging adult. Loss of sensory perception, loss of muscle strength, and ataxia or incoordination lead to a risk of falling that is 17-fold greater in the older diabetic compa...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016 Source:International Review of Neurobiology Author(s): A.I. Vinik, C. Casellini, M.-L. Névoret Here we review some seldom-discussed presentations of diabetic neuropathy, including large fiber dysfunction and peripheral autonomic dysfunction, emphasizing the impact of sympathetic/parasympathetic imbalance. Diabetic neuropathy is the most common complication of diabetes and contributes additional risks in the aging adult. Loss of sensory perception, loss of muscle strength, and ataxia or incoordination lead to a risk of falling that is 17-fold greater in the older ...
Source: International Review of Neurobiology - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
More News: Anxiety | Blogging | Brain | Cardiology | Cardiovascular | Depression | Diets | Electrocardiogram | Environmental Health | Harvard | Heart | Heart Attack | Information Technology | National Institute for Health and Clinical Excelle | Neurology | Nutrition | Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy | Sleep Disorders | Sleep Medicine | Sports Medicine | Study | Sugar