Integrative medicine approaches for pain treatment -- can they be an alternative to opioids?

(Wolters Kluwer Health) Can acupuncture and yoga help to fight the opioid epidemic? These and other integrative medicine approaches have shown at least preliminary evidence of effectiveness in pain management, according to an article in the December issue of Anesthesia&Analgesia -- a special thematic issue addressing the opioid crisis.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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“Drugs are a waste of time. They destroy your memory and your self-respect and everything that goes along with your self-esteem.” – Kurt Cobain I grew up in a close-knit, fairly religious family where children were seen and not heard, where mealtime meant everyone sat down together and exchanged pleasantries while enjoying the prepared-at-home repasts, complete with dessert. There was no distraction, either from television or radio, and the telephone ringing was a rare occurrence, quickly dispatched once the caller learned we were eating. In fact, nothing was so urgent back then. It was, indeed, a peacefu...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Alcoholism Drug Abuse Opioid Addiction Source Type: news
To the medical students, the patient was a conundrum.According to his chart, he had residual pain from a leg injury sustained while working on a train track. Now he wanted an opioid stronger than the Percocet he'd been prescribed. So why did his urine test positive for two other drugs — cocaine and hydromorphone, a powerful opioid that doctors had not ordered?It was up to Clark Yin, 29, to figure out what was really going on with Chris McQ, 58 — as seven other third-year medical students and two instructors watched."How are you going to have a conversation around the patient's positive tox screen r...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
As we follow the national opioid epidemic, with its greater than five deaths per hour from opioid overdoses, the focus is shifting to methods for limiting an individual’s exposure to these drugs. For most of us, our first contact with these highly addictive medications is after surgery. Studies now reveal that 60 percent of pills prescribed for pain after surgery go unused. These opioids often make their way to other family members, are kept for continued use by the surgical patient to maintain a feeling of euphoria, or even find their way out into the community. Limiting the number of pills and refills prescribed is...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Surgery Source Type: blogs
(University at Buffalo) Among older Americans, the poorest are the most likely to have used prescription opioids, according to a University at Buffalo study providing new insights into unexplored contours of the opioid crisis. The study also raises important questions about access to pain management options for the disadvantaged in the current climate of the opioid epidemic.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Better clinical guidance needed to stave off US-style opioid epidemic, warn researchers Related items fromOnMedica Minimum alcohol unit pricing finally goes live in Scotland Adjuvanted trivalent flu vaccine best option for over-65s Alcohol-specific deaths in England soar 11% in a decade Not so ‘smart’ drugs Review launched into prescription drug dependency
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
(Natural News) British doctors are calling for stricter rules in the management of painkillers in order to fight the opioid addiction epidemic. These medical professionals are now suggesting that patients who are given highly powerful opioids such as oxycodone and tramadol should be referred to special pain units who would then conduct monthly reviews. The...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Every physician takes the Hippocratic oath and promises to “do no harm.” In the face of the current opioid epidemic, this includes protecting our patients from dependence and addiction, including those who are suffering from debilitating acute and chronic pain. Sometimes this involves getting creative as we develop treatment plans. Luckily, opioids are not the only, nor always the best, defense against pain. One patient who avoided the negative side effects of long-term opioid use was Beth Hunt. Beth was living life...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs
There’s no disputing that the opioid crisis has become a public health emergency in the United States. And not a day goes by when health care providers don’t encounter some aspect of this epidemic. Far too often, the mention of addiction spurns images of homelessness, back-alley deals and crime. While that can certainly be the case, addiction is an “equal-opportunity employer.” Allow me to share two true stories that illustrate varying ways opioid addiction is encountered by health care providers. The cyclist “John” was a 40-year-old, athletic, easygoing bicyclist I met after he had been...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Abbott (NYSE:ABT) said today that it won a reimbursement nod from Aetna (NYSE:AET) for its Proclaim dorsal root ganglion neurostimulation therapy for treating chronic pain. The national coverage decision opens DRG treatment to some 22 million Aetna members, Abbott said. Aetna already covers treatment with Abbott’s spinal cord stimulation devices, the company said. It acquired the neurostim assets when it paid $25 billion for St. Jude Medical back in January 2017. “Since its launch in the U.S., Abbott’s DRG stimulation has had a profound impact for people living with complex pain conditions. One of the mos...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Abbott Reimbursement Source Type: news
Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine believe they might have latched onto the answer for one of the deadliest epidemics in recent history – the opioid crisis.  A new compound, AT-121, has the ability to treat pain and suppress the addictive effects of opioids, according to a new study published in the medical journal Science Translational Medicine.  “In our study, we found AT-121 to be safe and non-addictive, as well as an eff ective pain medication,” said Mei-Chuan Ko, Ph.D., professor…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news
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