Self-care: 4 ways to nourish body and soul

There’s a lot of talk about self-care these days, but what is it really? Self-care means paying attention to and supporting one’s own physical and mental health. It is also a big part of treatment for many physical and mental health disorders. It’s so, so important. But, it’s also one of the first things to fall by the wayside in times of stress, especially for those who are primary caregivers. This includes parents, people caring for elderly relatives, healthcare providers, and first responders. These are the people who often put the well-being of others above themselves. This is a big problem. Why is self-care important? Well, we can’t function very well if we aren’t very well. If it is important to us to be able to take care of others, then we must pay attention to our own well-being. My favorite analogy for this is clichéd, but accurate. When you get on an airplane and the flight attendant gives that safety spiel, when they get to the part about the oxygen masks, the first thing they tell you is: “If you’re traveling with children or others who need assistance, put your oxygen mask on first.” Think about it. Let’s say you don’t do that and you fall unconscious due to lack of oxygen, then no one gets the help they need. Lose/lose situation there. It’s the same deal in everyday life. When we don’t take care of ourselves, no one wins. And yet there is a pervasive cultural pressure to keep pu...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Mind body medicine Prevention Stress Source Type: blogs

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The dangers of alcohol begin at the first sip of the first drink. Although most responsible drinking habits shouldn’t be cause for major concern, everyone who drinks runs the risk of encountering the negative effects of alcohol. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans defines moderate drinking as up to 1 drink per day for women and up to 2 drinks per day for men.  A single drink is considered as: 12 ounces of beer (5% alcohol content) 8 ounces of malt liquor (7% alcohol content) 5 ounces of wine (12% alcohol content) 1.5 ounces of 80-proof (40% alcohol content) distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, ...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol dependency alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility Alcoholics Anonymous Source Type: blogs
Lately, you’ve been feeling fatigued and frustrated. Emotionally and physically. You’re wondering where the heck your energy and motivation went. Work feels like one big slog. You feel like you can’t meet the demands and deadlines. In fact, you dread even walking through the office doors. When you do get home, all you want to do is sit on the couch and veg out. In other words, you’re likely burned out. And you’re certainly not alone. A 2018 Gallup study of 7,500 full-time employees found that 23 percent experienced burnout very often or always, and 44 percent experienced it sometimes. Accordin...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress Burnout hustle overworked Productivity Workaholic Source Type: blogs
Conclusion It is apparent that athletes will be exposed to various stressors during both the preparatory and competition phases of the Summer Games. Athletes residing in the southern hemisphere appear to be at increased risk for illness during the preparatory phase, while female, Paralympic, water-sport and multi-competition/event athletes may be more susceptible to illness during the competition phase of the Summer Games. To maintain athlete health, illness prevention strategies should be targeted to stressors and at-risk athletes. Keeping athletes healthy will contribute to optimal Olympic and Paralympic athletic perfor...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
ConclusionOverall, GE ‐XR at 600 mg BID did not reduce alcohol consumption or craving in individuals with AUD. It is possible that, unlike the IR formulation of gabapentin, which showed efficacy in smaller Phase 2 trials at a higher dose, GE‐XR is not effective in treating AUD, at least not at doses approved by the F DA for treating other medical conditions.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Original Research Article Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Overall, GE-XR at 600 mg BID did not reduce alcohol consumption or craving in individuals with AUD. It is possible that, unlike the IR formulation of gabapentin, which showed efficacy in smaller Phase 2 trials at a higher dose, GE-XR is not effective in treating AUD, at least not at doses approved by the FDA for treating other medical conditions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30403402 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
This article originally appeared on Health.com
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime sleep Source Type: news
When a doctor in your hospital system kills himself, the entire medical staff receives a mass email informing everyone of “Dr. So-and-So’s sudden unexpected death”. Thoughts and prayers for his family and loved ones. Perhaps a link to your Employee Assistance Program is provided, for those who may need counseling or grief assistance.  This is followed later that day with another email detailing the schedule for the final arrangements. Calling hours. Funeral. Directions to the church.Not everyone will have known the physician. So most scan the email and then go about thei...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: blogs
A version of this article was originally published on Forbes. Sign up for Caroline’s newsletter to get her writing sent straight to your inbox. In all likelihood, you know what burnout feels like: Exhaustion, disinterest, poor performance, irritability, lack of empathy. The media often claims it’s caused by bad work environments; bad coworkers; bad bosses. This is partially true: Employees with large caseloads experience burnout more often. And individuals whose jobs revolve around people—such as social workers, customer service representatives, teachers, nurses and police officers—are particularl...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Note: This post is written by Dan Stelter Terrified in social situations? Feel everyone’s eyes on you? Like they can’t wait for you to screw up so they can criticize you? You may feel it’s impossible to overcome your fear. Will you be reserved to the corner of the room, or maybe your own home, for your entire life? Nope. You can be confident and comfortable in social situations that have haunted you your entire life. Well, you can if you follow these 90 strategies for overcoming shyness: Your anxious thoughts lie to you. They always tell you you’ll mess up and someone will reject you. A rare few pe...
Source: Life Optimizer - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Attitude Relationship Source Type: blogs
In all likelihood, you know what burnout feels like: Exhaustion, disinterest, poor performance, irritability, lack of empathy. The media often claims it's caused by bad work environments; bad coworkers; bad bosses. This is partially true: Employees with large caseloads experience burnout more often. And individuals whose jobs revolve around people--such as social workers, customer service representatives, teachers, nurses and police officers--are particularly predisposed it. Yet research also shows that some employees are more likely to burn out than others in identical work environments. Burnout is weakly correlate...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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