Medical guidelines discovered

Yesterday, in my usual scouring of the internet for the magic cure for all my ailments, I found an article about variability in cancer treatment and compliance with guidelines. Its an interesting read and how to make sure you are getting the right treatment with second opinions, good insurance coverage (plan ahead), yada yada yada.And then I asked myself, what guidelines? I have always assumed that some little group of doctors got together and over a few beers put together their guidelines for treatment for each ailment. Little did I know that NCIC provides guidelines for treatment of all cancers. Some of them are even available in patient format - meaning readable in by normal people who did not go to medical school. You can see the treatment guidelines for stage I and II breast cancer here.  And a list for all available patient guidelines by cancer type.I cannot tell you how cool this is. How often have I wondered about my treatment plan, was it in compliance with guidelines - meaning did it give me the best possible treatment? It was a lot of good reading and I want to review it all.Then if you go to the link for clinical practice guidelines, at the very bottom of the page is a link to all guidelines which takes you here for even more reading but it quickly becomes a bit technical because it is aimed at doctors. Feel free to start deciphering.Finally, there was a link to the guidelines for other diseases - meaning not cancer - which are at the National Guideline Clear...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer Tags: discovery guidelines reading treatment options Source Type: blogs

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tri Breast cancer is a disease of a specific organ, but its effects are felt throughout the body. The systemic effects of breast cancer can lead to functional limitations in patients who suffer from muscle weakness, fatigue, pain, fibromyalgia, or many other dysfunctions, which hasten cancer-associated death. Mechanistic studies have identified quite a few molecular defects in skeletal muscles that are associated with functional limitations in breast cancer. These include circulating cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and TGF-β altering the levels or function of myogenic molecules including PAX7, M...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Karin Meissner1,2*, Nicola Talsky1, Elisabeth Olliges1,2, Carmen Jacob1,3,4, Oliver J. Stötzer5, Christoph Salat5, Michael Braun6 and Raluca Flondor1 1Institute of Medical Psychology, Faculty of Medicine, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany 2Division of Health Promotion, Coburg University of Applied Sciences, Coburg, Germany 3Clinical Neurosciences, Clinical and Experimental Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom 4Wessex Neurological Centre, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, United Kingdom 5Haematology and Oncology, Outpatient Cancer Ca...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
One of the most potentially harmful aspects of genetically-modified crops, or GMOs, are that such crops are often engineered to be resistant to specific herbicides or pesticides. A farmer therefore can spray an herbicide to kill weeds, while the GM crop plant survives. But it means that the plant now has herbicide residues in it. Or it may contain its own built-in pesticide such as Bt toxin, expressed by the plant because the gene for this pest-resistant compound has been spliced into the plant’s genetic code. So GMO crops pose a double-whammy: the crop itself with new genetically-programmed components, especially pr...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: News & Updates dysbiosis Inflammation prebiotic probiotic sibo small intestinal bacterial overgrowth wheat belly Source Type: blogs
I started this blog when I was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2007. Blogging really helped me cope with my cancer and its treatment.However my life has moved on. I have blogged about it in the past - that my life was changing - breast cancer is no longer the main focus in my life.My chronic ailments have replaced that focus. While breast cancer never really goes away it turns more to be chronic illness than a terminal one, unless metastases appear. So I have a total of four chronic illnesses - breast cancer, thyroid cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia. I also have chronic physical ailments - bone spur, desiccat...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments blogging breast cancer chronic conditions Source Type: blogs
I get it. I have a lot of ailments so I am in a lot of groups and follow a lot of organizations for their health tips. So I get lots of email. Tons of email to be precise. Some of it gets the delete button right away - especially if the subject line doesn't tell me anything.But then Iread glance at a lot of them before deleting. But often they provide suggestions or instructions how to be healthier for whichever ailment. But now I am overloaded with instructions/suggestions this week:No more asparagus for me because itcan lead to breast cancer spread. I like asparagus. Damn.Exercise can reducebreast cancer recurrence. I'm ...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: breast cancer confusion fibromyalgia instructions rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: blogs
Once you get cancer or any other'nasty'medical ailment, this little phrase follows you for the rest of your life'because of your medical history...'. If you have this phrase following you around, you are lucky when you are not sent for more tests or additional follow appointments start filling your calendar.As a child I was not the one (sister) who had ear infections non-stop or the one (brother) that went running around into and over and under things resulting into many minor injuries requiring stitches, etc. I was the reasonably healthy one, except for a few colds here and there.Boom, at age 19, I was diagnosed with thyr...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: aggravation being a patient medical history Source Type: blogs
A 76-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of significant mitral regurgitation. She had a history of mastectomy for breast cancer, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, treated with amiodarone (200  mg once daily), and non-vitamin-K-oral anticoagulation; and fibromyalgia, necessitating the chronic intake of duloxetine (tricyclic antidepressant). Because of insufficient paint relief, her general practitioner had associated pregabilin (150 mg twice daily) a couple of days before admission. A lmost immediately after presentation, she collapsed because of a ventricular-fibrillation-arrest, prom...
Source: European Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Every day that I go out the door (which is not everyday), I go until I drop or that is what it feels like.Yesterday is an example: three doctor appointments at two different places 45 minutes apart, two stops at stores, one stop at my parents for 15 minutes, and then home. I was so tired by the time I got home, I was barely standing. I took the easy way out and got in bed for the next two hours.At my last stop, at the podiatrist that I have been going to since last summer, I ran into a friend who worked there. I knew she worked in a medical office but I didn't know she worked in that one. She only works two days a week whi...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: fatigue fibromyalgia naps rheumatoid arthritis tired Source Type: blogs
Finally, I am back on the fitness bandwagon. This week is my first full week of three days at the gym. Finally. I am excited, but exhausted.According to my card at the gym, I had an extended absence from October 4 to December 20. I was so excited to go back. But have forced myself to take it easy. With the help of the physical therapist at the gym, I cut back my exercise plan significantly. I cut down on the weight I use, the time I do cardio, and added a number of specific'knee strengthening'exercises. I also have spent three weeks only going twice a week.Its killing me.Every time I leave the gym, I am exhausted. and I co...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being active exhaustion fitness gym Source Type: blogs
I learned back in 2016 that bacon is not good for fibromyalgia. That was very sad. Now I have learned that bacon, or other processed meats like sausage,can increase your risk of getting breast cancer significantly." From an analysis of more than 260,000 women, researchers found that the risk of breast cancer increased by more than a fifth for those who consumed more than 9 grams of processed meats per day, which is the equivalent of around two sausages per week.However, the team found no link between red meat intake and the risk of breast cancer. "Well that's good news about red meat. But I would rather have...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient being healthy cancer risk food pouting Source Type: blogs
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