Did chemotherapy change your body?

A week or so ago, I had asked a doctor about change in your body due to chemotherapy. A friend and I had the same discussion yesterday. Does chemotherapy change a person's body in more ways than we think?I am talking about food and medications to be specific.Before chemotherapy, I enjoyed all kinds of seafood - preferably cold ocean water seafood to be precise. Shrimp, lobster, clams, oysters, scallops, cod, haddock, hake, salmon, calamari (octopus), and more. I never turned it down. Now I hate shrimp. I won't eat them. I can't stand them.More importantly are medical allergies. Before chemo, I was told I was allergic to amoxicillin and penicillin (full body rash and hives on an international business trip). I also reacted to the codeine in my pain meds after knee surgery. At my first chemo infusion, I learned I was also allergic to benadryl. Since chemo I have found I am allergic to:prednisone - also used to treat RA flare ups as well as allergic reactionsplaquenil - an old school RA drug voltaren gel - anti inflammatory used to treat specific areas of pain and inflammation with RAadhesives - as used on pain patchesI was given both prednisone and plaquenil at the same time when first treated for RA. I reacted to both. At the same time. How (not) fun.And as a result in being allergic to the 'cillins' I have a problem with any potential dental infections. There are four drugs commonly used to treat dental infections. Two are cillins so I can't have them. One is something else t...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer Tags: allergens changes chemotherapy reactions Source Type: blogs

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Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that the aberrant expression of CDCA gene family members plays an indispensable role in tumorigenesis. PMID: 31955607 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: Carbohydrate PolymersAuthor(s): Nadezhda E. Ustyuzhanina, Maria I. Bilan, Andrey S. Dmitrenok, Alexander S. Shashkov, Nora M.A. Ponce, Carlos A. Stortz, Nikolay E. Nifantiev, Anatolii I. UsovAbstractFucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FCS) HeSp was isolated from the Patagonian sea cucumber Hemioedema spectabilis. Ion-exchange chromatography was applied for purification of the FCS from the crude extract of sulfated polysaccharides. Analysis of monosaccharide and sulfate content of HeSp revealed the molar ratio of GlcA:GalNAc:Fuc:SO3Na as 1.15:1:1.1:3.9. Molecular weight...
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Cancer immune evasion is achieved through multiple layers of immune tolerance mechanisms including immune editing, recruitment of tolerogenic immune cells, and secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines. Recent success with immune checkpoint inhibitors in cancer immunotherapy suggests a dysfunctional immune synapse as a pivotal tolerogenic mechanism. Tumor cells express immune synapse proteins to suppress the immune system, which is often modulated by epigenetic mechanisms. When the methylation status of key immune synapse genes was interrogated, we observed disproportionately hypermethylated costimulatory genes and hypometh...
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Increased rates of locoregional recurrence are observed in patients with basal-like breast cancer (BC) despite the use of radiation therapy (RT); therefore, approaches that result in radiosensitization of basal-like BC are critically needed. Using patients’ tumor gene expression data from 4 independent data sets, we correlated gene expression with recurrence to find genes significantly correlated with early recurrence after RT. The highest-ranked gene, TTK, was most highly expressed in basal-like BC across multiple data sets. Inhibition of TTK by both genetic and pharmacologic methods enhanced radiosensitivity in mul...
Source: Journal of Clinical Investigation - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION We identified a population of HCV-specific CD4+ T cells with a follicular T helper cell signature that is maintained after therapy-induced elimination of persistent infection and may constitute an important target population for vaccination efforts to prevent reinfection and immunotherapeutic approaches for persistent viral infections.FUNDING Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, German Research Foundation), the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the European Union, the Berta-Ottenstein-Programme for Advanced Clinician Scientists, and the ANRS.
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