Borrelia burgdorferi glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins: a potential target for new therapeutics against Lyme disease.

Borrelia burgdorferi glycosaminoglycan-binding proteins: a potential target for new therapeutics against Lyme disease. Microbiology. 2017 Nov 08;: Authors: Lin YP, Li L, Zhang F, Linhardt RJ Abstract The spirochete bacterium Borrelia burgdorferisensu lato is the causative agent of Lyme disease, the most common vector-borne disease in Europe and the United States. The spirochetes can be transmitted to humans via ticks, and then spread to different tissues, leading to arthritis, carditis and neuroborreliosis. Although antibiotics have commonly been used to treat infected individuals, some treated patients do not respond to antibiotics and experience persistent, long-term arthritis. Thus, there is a need to investigate alternative therapeutics against Lyme disease. The spirochete bacterium colonization is partly attributed to the binding of the bacterial outer-surface proteins to the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains of host proteoglycans. Blocking the binding of these proteins to GAGs is a potential strategy to prevent infection. In this review, we have summarized the recent reports of B. burgdorferisensu lato GAG-binding proteins and discussed the potential use of synthetic and semi-synthetic compounds, including GAG analogues, to block pathogen interaction with GAGs. Such information should motivate the discovery and development of novel GAG analogues as new therapeutics for Lyme disease. New therapeutic approaches should eventually reduce the burden of Lym...
Source: Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Microbiology Source Type: research

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AbstractBorreliosis (Lyme disease) is a spirochetal disease caused by the species complex ofBorrelia burgdorferi transmitted byIxodes spp. ticks. Recorded to be the most common tick ‐borne disease in the world, the last two decades have seen an increase in disease incidence and distribution, exceeding 360 000 cases in Europe alone. If untreated, infection may cause skin symptoms, arthritis, neurological or cardiac complications. Borrelia spirochetes have developed strategies to evade the mammalian host immune system. These include the complement system, which is an important first‐line defence mechanism against invadin...
Source: FEBS Letters - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research
Publication date: 17 March 2020Source: Cell Reports, Volume 30, Issue 11Author(s): Abdul G. Lone, Troy Bankhead
Source: Cell Reports - Category: Cytology Source Type: research
Single multiplexed assays could replace the standard 2-tiered (STT) algorithm recommended for the laboratory diagnosis of Lyme disease if they perform with a specificity and a sensitivity superior or equal to those of the STT algorithm. We used human serum rigorously characterized to be sera from patients with acute- and convalescent-phase early Lyme disease, Lyme arthritis, and posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome, as well as the necessary controls (n = 241 samples), to select the best of 12 Borrelia burgdorferi proteins to improve our microfluidic assay (mChip-Ld). We then evaluated its serodiagnostic performance in compa...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Immunoassays Source Type: research
(Natural News) Lyme disease and rheumatoid arthritis are two different diseases that share many symptoms. A patient will benefit from knowing how to tell them apart. The diseases have different origins. Lyme disease is a bacterial disease caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi, which infect humans via tick bites. Meanwhile, rheumatoid arthritis stems from a mixture of...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In 1975, researchers from Yale investigated an epidemic of 51 patients with arthritis who lived near the woodsy town of Lyme, Connecticut. The most common symptom was recurrent attacks of knee swelling. A few had pain in other joints, such as the wrist or ankle. Many had fever, fatigue, and headache. Some remembered a round skin rash before the onset of knee swelling. We now know that Lyme disease is an infection acquired from tick bites, caused by a spiral bacterium named Borrelia burgdorferi. After a tick bite, Borrelia bacteria wriggle through the skin away from the bite site. This leads to a circular red rash, known as...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Bones and joints Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
Lyme disease is a multisystem disorder caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. A common late-stage complication of this disease is oligoarticular arthritis, often involving the knee. In ∼10% of cases, arthritis persists after appropriate antibiotic treatment, leading to a proliferative synovitis typical of chronic inflammatory arthritides. Here, we provide evidence...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: PNAS Plus Source Type: research
Borrelia burgdorferi is a tick-borne bacterium responsible for approximately 300,000 annual cases of Lyme disease (LD) in the United States, with increasing incidences in other parts of the world. The debilitating nature of LD is mainly attributed to the ability of B. burgdorferi to persist in patients for many years despite strong anti-Borrelia antibody responses. Antimicrobial treatment of persistent infection is challenging. Similar to infection of humans, B. burgdorferi establishes long-term infection in various experimental animal models except for New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits, which clear the spirochete within 4 t...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Cellular Microbiology: Pathogen-Host Cell Molecular Interactions Source Type: research
This study presented examples of base-calling DNA sequencing electropherograms routinely generated in a clinical diagnostic laboratory on DNA extracts of human blood specimens and ticks collected from human skin bites and from the environment. Since some of the tick samples tested were collected in Ireland, borrelial species or strains not known to exist in the United States were also detected by analysis of this 16S rRNA “core genome”. We recommend that hospital laboratories located in Lyme disease endemic areas begin to use a “core genome” sequencing test to routinely diagnose spir...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Lyme disease is caused by the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted via the bite of an infected tick. B. burgdorferi enters the skin, disseminates via the bloodstream, and infects various distal tissues, leading to inflammatory sequelae, such as Lyme arthritis and Lyme carditis. B. burgdorferi linear plasmid 36 (lp36) is critical for mammalian infectivity; however, the full complement of genes on lp36 that contribute to this process remains unknown. Through a targeted mutagenesis screen of the genes on lp36, we identified a novel infectivity gene of unknown function, bbk13, which encodes an immunogenic, non-su...
Source: Infection and Immunity - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Bacterial Infections Source Type: research
John R. Caskey1,2†, Nicole R. Hasenkampf1, Dale S. Martin1, Vladimir N. Chouljenko2, Ramesh Subramanian2, Mercedes A. Cheslock1 and Monica E. Embers1* 1Division of Bacteriology and Parasitology, Tulane National Primate Research Center, Tulane University Health Sciences, Covington, LA, United States 2Division of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, United States Recent studies have shown that Borrelia burgdorferi can form antibiotic-tolerant persisters in the presence of microbiostatic drugs such as doxycycline. Precisely how this...
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
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