Sleep Apnea may increase risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

(American Thoracic Society) Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may put elderly people at greater risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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We present how new discoveries from animal models, human sleep experiments, and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers point to an active role of disturbed sleep in dementia pathogenesis. We show preliminary data on how sex, genetics, physical exercise and cognitive reserve can strengthen or weaken the association between obstructive sleep apnea and dementia. We present preliminary results of obstructive sleep apnea treatment, which can slow, stop or reverse neurodegenerative processes accentuated by obstructive sleep apnea, even in individuals already affected by a neurodegenerative disease. We propose future research directions ...
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research
Early intervention to treat sleep disorders such as obstructive sleep apnea may help prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease.
Source: ENT Today - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Online Exclusives Practice Focus Sleep Medicine alzheimer's disease Source Type: research
A new study finds that obstructive sleep apnea is tied to brain structure alterations found in early dementia and that low blood oxygen might be a factor.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Alzheimer's / Dementia Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Proteomic biomarkers in participants with cognitive impairment suggest roles for insulin, and vascular signaling pathways, some of which are similar to findings in Alzheimer's disease. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of CI in OSAS will help focus clinical trials needed in this patient population. PMID: 29968150 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Genomics Proteomics ... - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
ConclusionsProteomic biomarkers in participants with cognitive impairment suggest roles for insulin, and vascular signaling pathways, some of which are similar to findings in Alzheimer ’s disease. A better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of CI in OSAS will help focus clinical trials needed in this patient population.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is associated with preclinical AD imaging markers of neurodegeneration, but not with amyloid. PMID: 29953971 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord Source Type: research
Conclusion: Multimorbidity is associated with preclinical AD imaging markers of neurodegeneration, but not with amyloid.Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2018;45:272 –281
Source: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders - Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research
PMID: 29373798 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Respir Crit Care Med Source Type: research
This study aimed at identify the preclinical alterations of sleep, neuropsychological, cerebrospinal-fluid, and 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG PET) in OSA patients.
Source: Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breathing Disorders Source Type: research
Introduction: Increasing evidence suggests sleep can influence the risk for development of Alzheimer disease (AD), but the precise features of sleep architecture influencing this risk and the role of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in contributing to this risk remain only partially characterized. Current models of AD suggest that pathological changes, including the accumulation of proteins beta-amyloid (A β) and tau, can occur years to even decades before clinical symptoms of memory impairment become evident.
Source: Sleep Medicine - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Aging and Developmental Issues Source Type: research
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