Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

HPV vaccine also prevents uncommon childhood respiratory disease, study suggests

(Infectious Diseases Society of America) The vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Related Links:

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, first developed to help guard against cervical cancer, also seems to protect against a rare, chronic childhood respiratory disease.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
THURSDAY, Nov. 9, 2017 -- The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, first developed to help guard against cervical cancer, also seems to protect against a rare, chronic childhood respiratory disease, a new study suggests. It's believed that the...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-019 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research on how the healthcare delivery system enhances or inhibits the effectiveness of a provider's recommendation of the adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Characteristics of the provider, parent/patient, and clinical setting, can all affect whether a provider makes a recommendation, and whether that recommendation results in uptake of the HPV vaccine. This research requires expertise in cancer prevention, adult and childhood behavior, immunization promotion, and healthcare delivery
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
Funding Opportunity PAR-18-008 from the NIH Guide for Grants and Contracts. This Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) encourages research on how the healthcare delivery system enhances or inhibits the effectiveness of a provider's recommendation of the adolescent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Characteristics of the provider, parent/patient, and clinical setting, can all affect whether a provider makes a recommendation, and whether that recommendation results in uptake of the HPV vaccine. This research requires expertise in cancer prevention, adult and childhood behavior, immunization promotion, and healthcare delivery.
Source: NIH Funding Opportunities (Notices, PA, RFA) - Category: Research Source Type: funding
(Reuters Health) - Childhood cancer survivors in the U.S. are much less likely to have had human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations compared to their peers, despite being at increased risk from the virus, according to a new study.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Abstract The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that adolescents routinely receive tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine (1) at age 11-12 years. ACIP also recommends catch-up vaccination with hepatitis B vaccine, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine, and varicella vaccine for adolescents who are not up to date with childhood vaccinations. ACIP recommends a booster dose of MenACWY at age 16 years (1). In December 2016, ACIP updated HPV vaccine recommendations to include a 2-dose ...
Source: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkl... - Category: Epidemiology Authors: Tags: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep Source Type: research
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Research suggests health providers are key to boosting HPV vaccination rates of childhood cancer survivors, who, as a group, are at increased risk for second cancers associated with the human papillomavirus.
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news
Anti-vaccine advocate Robert F. Kennedy Jr. said that President-elect Donald Trump asked him to lead a new government commission on vaccine safety. But science on this issue is already clear; numerous studies show that vaccines are safe and effective, and that serious side effects are rare. On Jan. 10, Kennedy met with the president-elect at Trump Tower, and later told reporters about the new commission. However, the Trump administration did not confirm that such a commission was in the works. A spokesperson for Trump said only that the president-elect was “exploring the possibility of forming a committee on autism,&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer worldwide, and Romania has the highest rate of cervical cancer in Europe. Sixty-five young Romanian women infected with HIV during early childhood and 25 control subjects were evaluated for the presence of cervical HPV infection and for cytologic abnormalities. HPV infection was evaluated longitudinally in 42 HIV-infected individuals. Overall 28/65 (43.1%) of HIV-infected and 8/25 (32.0%) of uninfected subjects were infected with HPV, and 21/65 (32.3%) and 6/25 (24%) had high-risk subtypes, respectively. In HIV-infected women, those maintaining or acqui...
Source: International Journal of STD and AIDS - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: Original research articles Source Type: research
Only 40 percent of girls and 21 percent of boys get the shots, which prevent infections with cancer-causing human papillomavirus, or HPV.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children and Childhood Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Columns Live Personal Health Source Type: news
More News: Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cancer Vaccines | Cervical Cancer Vaccine | Childhood Cancer | Genital Warts | Human Papillomavirus (HPV) | Infectious Diseases | Respiratory Medicine | Study | Vaccines