I love my kids but they ’ve ruined my neck

I recently wrote about how my oldest son learned how to ride a bike. His excitement got me to buy a used one, mostly because running after him down the street wasn’t going to be a solid long-range plan. Now, Milo and I get to explore on two wheels. We discovered a pond with ducks not far from the house and we’ve met a lot more people in the neighborhood, mostly ones who own dogs. It’s also been a great way to show him what I want him to do on the bike — stay to the side of the road, wait until cars stop before you cross, and look behind you to see … Maybe not that one. I once had that easy range of motion, but it’s gone, and I blame Milo and his younger brother Levi. I love them, but they’ve destroyed my neck. They’ve also destroyed my lower back, sleep rhythms, and knowledge of current events. But right now, it’s about the neck, and they’re not going to smile their way out of it. For six years, I’ve been constantly looking down, to read to them, to answer their questions, to hold them until I fall asleep in chairs with them. Again, all their fault. Or maybe not completely. Vijay Dayanani is a physical therapist at Harvard Medical School-affiliated Spaulding Outpatient Center and says the main culprit is technology. Laptops, iPads, and cell phones have created a looking-down culture, bringing the neck out of its ideal neutral position and perpetually stressing the muscles to where they eventually lock up. Pare...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Pain Management Parenting neck pain Source Type: blogs

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Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Antipsychotic Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychology Psychotherapy Bipolar disorder and schizophrenia comorbid comorbid psychiatric conditions Comorbidities Comorbidity Diagnosis Of Schizophrenia Livi Source Type: blogs
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