Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain—One Therapeutic Approach for the Opioid Epidemic

Opioids are frequently prescribed for chronic pain. For the past 2 decades, long-term opioid analgesic therapy was considered the cornerstone of effective pain management for chronic nonmalignant conditions, despite a lack of documented effectiveness and safety, with the attendant risk of addiction, overdose, and death. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may be used effectively to treat chronic pain, either as a stand-alone treatment or with other nonopioid pharmacological treatments. CBT improves pain-related outcomes along with mobility, quality of life, and disability and mood outcomes. Compared with long-term use of opioids, CBT has dramatically lower risks and may therefore be worth pursuing.
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Practice - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Articles Source Type: research

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There is increasing evidence in oncology that pain management contributes to broad quality-of-life improvement. To maximize patient outcomes, pain management is an essential part of oncologic management. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided 125I brachytherapy in treating adult cancer pain.
Source: Brachytherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Conclusions Evidence supports the use of ketamine for acute pain in a variety of contexts, including as a stand-alone treatment, as an adjunct to opioids, and, to a lesser extent, as an intranasal formulation. Contraindications for acute pain are similar to those for chronic pain, partly based on the observation that the dosage ranges are similar. Larger studies evaluating different acute pain conditions are needed to enhance patient selection, determine the effectiveness of nonparenteral ketamine alternatives, define optimal treatment parameters, and develop protocols optimizing safety and access to care.
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Special Article Source Type: research
Conclusions Injection speed of LA in the range of 12 to 1800 mL/h did not affect common peroneal nerve block duration. Clinical Trial Registration This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT02801799.
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
A  story in today’s Wall Street Journal discusses the latest report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development on ”prime age” (25-54) labor-force participation rates among its 35 member countries through the last quarter of 2017. While the US rate has improved, it remains below the average OECD rate, lagging behind such developed countries as Japan and the UK. What’s puzzling is why the authors of the report decided to weigh in on the opioid overdose issue.Noting that per capita opioid prescriptions in the US are “significantly higher” than in othe...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
NEW YORK (AP) — Can legalizing marijuana fight the problem of opioid addiction and fatal overdoses? Two new studies in the debate suggest it may. Pot can relieve chronic pain in adults, so advocates for liberalizing marijuana laws have proposed it as a lower-risk alternative to opioids. But some research suggests marijuana may encourage opioid use, and so might make the epidemic worse. The new studies don’t directly assess the effect of legalizing marijuana on opioid addiction and overdose deaths. Instead, they find evidence that legalization may reduce the prescribing of opioids. Over-prescribing is considered...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Local News Dr. Mallika Marshall Legalized Marijuana opioid Recreational Marijuana Source Type: news
Conclusion Some Medicaid recipients who gained coverage under the ACA may have become addicted to opioids, but we find little evidence that Medicaid expansion caused aggregate drug-related death rates to increase. Future research on the opioid epidemic should develop approaches that untangle the effects of Medicaid expansion from pre-existing economic trends and the spread of accessible illegal drugs. That said, by addressing the causes of addiction and promoting appropriate treatment, Medicaid could be an important tool for policy makers in the fight against opioid abuse. In January 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medi...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Following the ACA Medicaid and CHIP Public Health Quality Medicaid expansion opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs
I didn’t vote for you. You see, I was born with a brain injury. Doctors at Children’s Hospital in Boston told my parents I would never be able to walk normally. Young children are mean. As a young boy, insults, and laughs became a daily ritual. When I walked into a classroom, a restaurant, or down a street, people didn’t look into my eyes. They always looked down as I limped awkwardly along. But I overcame and became a varsity athlete at a prep school outside of Boston. As a teenager, I grew strong, and anybody that made fun of my limp or my awkward gate became irrelevant. Frankly, Mr. President, the day ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Mr. President, what in God’s name are you doing? Your Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, has turned the clock back in our country almost 35 years. Our nation’s heroin epidemic is a health crisis and will never be solved with a lock-’em-up-and-throw-away-the-key solution. Despite all intelligent research leading to a mandate conclusion that incarceration will not ever diminish drug addiction and the radical negative effects it has on our economy, “My Favorite Martian,” Jeff Sessions, has just ordered federal prosecutors to chase far harsher sentences against drug-addict-criminals. Mr. Trump, who ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Medicaid programs are at the center of the opioid epidemic. Nearly 12 percent of adults covered by Medicaid have a substance use disorder, including opioid use disorder. Available data suggest that Medicaid beneficiaries are prescribed painkillers at higher rates than non-Medicaid patients and have a higher risk of overdose, from both prescription opioids and illegal versions including heroin and fentanyl. In addition to the human toll, abuse of opioids has significant financial effects. In 2010, Arizona Medicaid paid for more than half of all opioid-related emergency department admissions, and in 2012, 81 percent of the $...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Costs and Spending Medicaid and CHIP Public Health opioid epidemic preferred drug lists prescription drug abuse prescription drug monitoring programs prior authorization requirements Section 1115 Waivers Source Type: blogs
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