Cardio: How many runners will collapse this weekend?

The New York City Marathon is this weekend. It’s the world’s biggest race with more than 50,000 people running 26 miles non-stop. I wonder how many lives will be claimed this year. I’m not exaggerating. It happens every time… Last year in London, 31-year-old Army captain David Seath collapsed three miles from the finish line. He died a few hours later. A couple years before that, two runners — ages 31 and 35 — died during a marathon in Raleigh, North Carolina. I was unfortunate enough to witness this pattern firsthand… About 30 years, I provided emergency care for marathon runners. At one race, I saw a thin, young man fall to the ground just feet from our emergency aid station. His heart was beating erratically as we placed an oxygen mask over his blue lips. Seconds later, another runner arrived at our station and keeled over. He was dizzy, weak and scared. He had a dangerously erratic heartbeat. This man was only in his early 20s. The sad part is that marathon runners think they’re getting healthy by training for these long-distance runs. But the truth is, this kind of cardio is hurting your health. I once asked a long-distance runner I knew why he dragged himself out of bed at 5 a.m. every morning, laced up his running shoes and pounded away on the treadmill for 45 minutes. He told me he was tired of being overweight for years and never wanted to be fat again. I admire his dedication. But here’s the thing… Long-...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Fitness bread cardio cereal crackers exercise fat insulin New York City Marathon Weight Loss Source Type: news

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Two years ago, much ado was made about what appeared to be a decline in obesity rates among 2- to 5-year-olds, a finding based on a national study of fewer than 1,000 children that age. However, subsequent analyses have shown the decline to be transient at best. The number of overweight, obese and severely obese children in that age group — as well as older children, adolescents and adults — has only continued to climb. Significant efforts to address obesity have been made, but they have not been effective at a national level. They include improving the quality of food available at public sc...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Obesity Pediatrics Primary Care Source Type: blogs
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news
Chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS)—used frequently in fast-food wrappers and other products for their oil- and water-repellant properties—have been linked to hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol and even cancer. Now, a new study suggests that exposure to the chemicals could make it harder to keep weight off after dieting. The study, published in PLOS Medicine, found that levels of PFAS in the blood were linked to greater weight gain in a group of people who had recently shed pounds, especially among the women. Another finding may hint at why: People with higher blood levels ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight All NNLM MAR funding opportunities are currently closed. In February, we will announce opportunities to apply for projects starting May 15, 2018. Now is the perfect time to start meeting with potential partners and consulting with NNLM MAR staff on health information outreach ideas. Contact us to set up a consultation. National Drug and Alcohol Facts Week® begins on Monday! If your organization is getting involved with busting myths about drug use or addiction, tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news
Despite what the mainstream media is telling you, sugar is not your enemy. Your body evolved to eat sweet foods. In fact, it’s how our ancestors knew a food growing in the wild was safe to eat and healthy. But your body did not evolve to eat starchy, high carbohydrate sugars from bread, pasta, cereal and other grains. Ever since we were told to eat low fat, this has been the bulk of the our diet. The result has been a modern epidemic of obesity and diabetes. At the same time, we face skyrocketing rates of dementia and Alzheimer’s. Big Pharma has been trying for decades to come...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
We enjoy outdoor activities. My family will be coming over this year and I will fire up the grill for a delicious BBQ grass-fed beef. We’ll play games like badminton and horseshoes. Now while these games can be fun, they can lead to cuts and bruises. I want to aim you with an unconventional solution for those wounds.  For years now, sugar’s been a dirty word. It’s been blamed for everything from obesity, heart disease and diabetes to tooth decay and acne. But there’s something they don’t know.  Sugar’s better for you than all those artificial sweeteners and substitutes out th...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
If I told you to eat what you love and cut back on your workouts if you want to lose weight, you might tell me I’m crazy. Diet and fitness “experts” certainly would. But their terrible advice about fitness and nutrition has led to the current obesity epidemic. Nearly 40% of Americans are now obese and nearly 70% are overweight. And the problem is only getting worse. A new study in the prestigious JAMA medical journal reports that more people are giving up on trying to lose weight.1 Researchers asked 27,350 overweight and obese adults whether they had tried to lose weight in the past 12 months. Since 198...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Losing weight is no easy task, and myths persist about how to do it—which end up making it even harder. To cut through the confusion, here are nine common misconceptions about weight loss and dieting, and what the science actually says. Myth #1: It’s impossible to lose weight It’s tough—just ask anyone who’s tried. But it’s not impossible. The National Weight Control Registry began keeping track in 1994 of people who lost at least 30 pounds and kept it off for a year or longer. Today, more than 10,000 Americans are part of the registry—with an average weight loss of 66 pounds, kept...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized best way to lose weight best weight loss calories how to lose weight losing weight weight gain weight loss diet Source Type: news
Author Affiliations open 1Department of Epidemiology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA 2Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA 3Department of Earth Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA 4Department of Pathology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA PDF Version (188 KB) Abstract About This Article Supplemental Material Background: Rice contains arsenic, a known skin carcinogen. Rice intake has been associated with arsenic-related skin lesions in South Asia, but its association with skin ...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
The image illustrates inductive browning of inguinal white adipose tissue (H&E staining shown in the background) by dibenzazepine-loaded nanoparticles (five particles shown in the front). Credit: Alexander M. Gokan Brown fat cells are much easier for...
Source: Medgadget - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Medicine Nanomedicine Source Type: blogs
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