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Vitamin D may be key for pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome

(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Vitamin D may play a key role in helping some women seeking treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-related infertility get pregnant. PCOS is a hormonal disorder affecting 5 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age. Results of the study show women who were Vitamin D deficient when starting fertility treatments were 40 percent less likely to achieve a pregnancy.
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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The impact of vitamin D deficiency on the success of ovulation induction (OI) cycles and the risk pregnancy complications after OI has not been extensively investigated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the relationship between preconception vitamin D status and reproductive outcomes in women with a diagnosis of either PCOS or unexplained infertility treated with OI.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Oral session Source Type: research
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