H3N2 Virus in Swine at Fairs and Transmission to Humans H3N2 Virus in Swine at Fairs and Transmission to Humans

Human influenza A virus infections were reported after exposure to infected swine at agricultural fairs.Emerging Infectious Diseases
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

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AbstractInfluenza A viruses evolve rapidly to escape host immunity. In swine, this viral evolution has resulted in the emergence of multiple H1 and H3 influenza A virus (IAV) lineages in the United States (US) pig populations. The heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy is a promising way to deal with diverse IAV infection in multiple animal models. However, whether or not this vaccination strategy is applicable to US swine to impart immunity against infection from North American strains of IAV is still unknown. We performed a vaccination-challenge study to evaluate the protective efficacy of using multivalent inacti...
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
In this study, 15 H1N1, one H1N2, and four H3N2 strains were isolated from a total of 4080 nasal swabs which were collected from 20 pig farms in three provinces in China between 2016 and 2019. All the isolates were clustered into four genotypes. A new genotype represented by the H1N2 strain was found, whose fragments came from the triple reassortant H1N2 lineage, classical swine influenza virus (cs-H1N1) lineage, and 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus lineage. A/Sw/HB/HG394/2018(H1N1), which was clustered into the cs-H1N1 lineage, showed a close relationship with the 1918 pandemic virus. Mutations determining the host range specific...
Source: Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
Why are some people better able to fight off the flu than others? Part of the answer, according to a new study, is related to the first flu strain we encounter in childhood.Scientists from UCLA and the University of Arizona have found that people ’s ability to fight off the flu virus is determined not only by the subtypes of flu they have had throughout their lives, but also by the sequence in which they are been infected by the viruses. Their study is published in the open-access journal PLoS Pathogens.The research offers an explanation for why some people fare much worse than others when infected with the...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
A recent study in this journal reported the cross-species transmission of a novel swine H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) to humans and suggested a heavy threat from the H3N2 IAVs (1). Vaccination remains the primary option for the control of influenza, but the protective efficiency of seasonal vaccines against H3N2 IAVs are suboptimal. Recent human H3N2 IAVs have shown poor growth in MDCK cells and eggs due to their low receptor binding affinities. A high yield strain is required for the vaccine manufacture, however, mutations of vaccine seeds during egg adaptation has reported to reduce the vaccine effectiveness (2).
Source: Journal of Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
Influenza A virus infection is a global health threat to livestock and humans, causing substantial mortality and morbidity. As both pigs and humans are readily infected with influenza viruses of similar subtype, the pig is a robust and appropriate model for investigating swine and human disease. We evaluated the efficacy of the human cold-adapted 2017–2018 quadrivalent seasonal LAIV in pigs against H1N1pdm09 challenge. LAIV immunized animals showed significantly reduced viral load in nasal swabs. There was limited replication of the H1N1 component of the vaccine in the nose, a limited response to H1N1 in the lung lym...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
This study reports virological and epidemiological data accumulated through passive surveillance conducted during 1,825 herd visits from 2011 to 2018. Among them, 887 (48.6%) tested swIAV-positive. The proportion of positive cases remained stable year-on-year and year-round. The European avian-like swine H1N1 (H1avN1) virus was the most frequently identified (69.6%), and was widespread across the country. The European human-like reassortant swine H1N2 (H1huN2) virus accounted for 22.1% and was only identified in the north-western quarter and recently in the far north. The 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) virus (3.6%) was detec...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Abstract In 2018, a 15-year-old female adolescent in Australia was infected with swine influenza A(H3N2) variant virus. The virus contained hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes derived from 1990s-like human seasonal viruses and internal protein genes from influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, highlighting the potential risk that swine influenza A virus poses to human health in Australia. PMID: 31661057 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Emerg Infect Dis Source Type: research
Y. Deng et al.
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Veterinary MicrobiologyAuthor(s): Haiyan Sun, Jung-Hyang Sur, Sarah Sillman, David Steffen, Hiep L.X. VuAbstractThe substantial genetic diversity exhibited by influenza A viruses of swine (IAV-S) represents the main challenge for the development of a broadly protective vaccine against this important pathogen. The consensus vaccine immunogen has proven an effective vaccinology approach to overcome the extraordinary genetic diversity of RNA viruses. In this project, we sought to determine if a consensus IAV-S hemagglutinin (HA) immunogen would elicit broad protective ...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
This study illustrates how recurrent influenza infections increase the co-infection risk and facilitate evolutionary jumps by successive gene exchanges. It recalls the importance of appropriate biosecurity measures inside holdings to limit virus persistence and interspecies transmissi ons, which both contribute to the emergence of new potentially zoonotic viruses.
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
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