Dealing with a diagnosis of epilepsy: Common questions from parents

A diagnosis of epilepsy can seem overwhelming: You likely have a lot of questions about how seizures — and their treatment — will affect your child’s life and what that might mean for your family. That’s why education is crucial for helping ensure that you understand as much as possible about the condition. Events such as the Fifth Annual Epilepsy Awareness Day at Disneyland are wonderful opportunities to learn from experts and from other families. Here, Dr. Arnold Sansevere of the Epilepsy Center at Boston Children’s Hospital answers five common questions from parents and kids. What causes seizures? A. Seizures result from abnormal electrical activity in the brain: Some parts of the brain get over-excited and fire off too many electrical signals. Common causes include an abnormality in brain development and underlying genetic causes, in addition to past infections or brain injury. In many cases, we don’t know the cause of a child’s seizures. When children go on to have multiple seizures, the disorder is referred to as epilepsy. Epilepsy can involve many different types of seizures: Some are easy to recognize, as when your child’s body shakes and they become temporarily less aware. Other seizures have subtle outward signs such as altered consciousness, staring and eyelid fluttering. Epilepsy sometimes can be associated with and put children at risk of behavior problems, ADD/ADHD, learning difficulties, depression and anxie...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Ask the Expert Diseases & Conditions Dr. Arnold Sansevere epilepsy epilepsy center seizures Source Type: news

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Little is known about mechanisms underlying nocturia in women with bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). The thalamus plays a primary role in the organization of the sleep-wake cycle. Our hypothesis was that nocturia is associated with activation of the thalamus in women with BPS/IC as compared to controls.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Non-Oral Poster Source Type: research
Preoperative anxiety has been associated with increased postoperative pain and lower patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of listening to music just prior to surgery on preoperative anxiety compared to usual care in patients undergoing reconstructive pelvic surgery.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Oral Poster Source Type: research
Anxiety can be measured in various ways. State anxiety is temporary and is sensitive to change. Our study aims to characterize the reasons for anxiety among women presenting for their initial gynecology visit, to measure the change in state anxiety after the visit, and to correlate anxiety improvement with visit satisfaction.
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Non-Oral Poster Source Type: research
To evaluate the effect of preoperative depression on length of stay and disposition following pelvic reconstructive surgery (PRS).
Source: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Non-Oral Poster Source Type: research
Identifying the degree of attitudes has a critical effect on the application of hospice and palliative care. However, studies on hospice and palliative care attitudes highlight only statistically significant outcomes and do not propose comprehensive conclusions or generalizations about attitudes. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to synthesize and appraise articles that analyzed nurses' attitudes regarding palliative care services. After compiling, the finally selected 13 articles indicated that influencing factors on nurses' attitudes were experience in caring for the dying, career or education level, knowledge ...
Source: Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing - Category: Nursing Tags: Feature Articles Source Type: research
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Authors: Southwell BR Abstract Introduction: Constipation occurs in many children and can become chronic. Many grow out of it but for one third, it continues into adulthood. For most patients there is no identifiable organic disorder and it is classified as functional constipation.Areas covered: In 2016, the field was extensively reviewed by Rome IV. This review covers meta-analyses and evidence for treatment of paediatric constipation since 2016 and new emerging treatments.Expert opinion: Since 2016, meta-analyses conclude 1) fibre should be included in a normal diet, but further supplementation does not improve c...
Source: Expert Review of Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol Source Type: research
Physicians taking care of pediatric burn patients should be familiar with the concept of judicious fluid resuscitation and careful use of beta ‐blocker in severe burn with concern of myocardial depression. AbstractCardiac stress is a critical determinant of outcomes associated with severe thermal injury. The cardiovascular response to a catecholamine ‐mediated surge from severe burns passes through two phases. Initial hypovolemia with myocardial depression leads to a low cardiac output, which then progresses to a hyperdynamic‐hypermetabolic phase with increased cardiac output.
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Vagus nerve stimulation for refractory epilepsy may induce laryngeal side effects such as dysphonia and dysphagia. Careful tuning of the stimulation parameters and collaboration between epileptologists and otolaryngologists can help significantly reduce side effects. AbstractVagus nerve stimulation for refractory epilepsy may induce laryngeal side effects such as dysphonia and dysphagia. Careful tuning of the stimulation parameters and collaboration between epileptologists and otolaryngologists can help significantly reduce side effects.
Source: Clinical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: CASE REPORT Source Type: research
Hypocupremia can result in a bi ‐lineage deficiency of leukocytes and erythrocytes. Although commonly seen from gastrointestinal malabsorption, hypocupremia can be further exacerbated with excessive zinc intake causing increased fecal copper excretion. Dietary supplementation is prevalent in the outpatient setting and must be co nsidered as a possible source of hematologic pathologies. AbstractHypocupremia can result in a bi ‐lineage deficiency of leukocytes and erythrocytes. Although commonly seen from gastrointestinal malabsorption, hypocupremia can be further exacerbated with excessive zinc intake causing increased ...
Source: Clinical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: CASE REPORT Source Type: research
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