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Reducing Opioid Abuse, A Quick Guide to Internet Resources

By DAVID HARLOW, MD The opioid crisis has been upon us for years now, and we are now seeing the problem become more pervasive, with more than 90 deaths per day in the U.S. due to this scourge. The president recently said he would be declaring a public health emergency (which would free up some funds) but has not done so as of this writing. The public health threat is so persistent that it calls for responses on many levels, and those responses are coming. Some have been in place for a while, some are more recent. These responses may be broken down into a number of different categories: Broader availability of naloxone (antidote) and related training to first responders, health care providers and the general public (though of course in our litigious society, applicability of Good Samaritan laws to naloxone use by laypersons is a consideration) Medication-assisted treatment following acute episodes (emergency room visits) States imposing limits on prescribing and dispensing, mandating education and other innovations (for example, Massachusetts’ first-in-the nation opioids law (including the first state law limiting most opioid prescriptions to a seven-day supply), enacted in 2015, with a follow-up law enacted in 2016 that among other things offers a system for recording and communicating a voluntary opiate “opt-out” for individuals); and limiting pharma payments to physicians in order to discourage incentives for high-prescriber status (current prop...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Charlie Baker Harlow Internet Massachussetts Opioid Opioid crisis Source Type: blogs

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The widespread U.S. opioid &overdose crisis is an ever-increasing tragic concern for everyone: writhing victims, family members being fain to see their relatives suffer or die, doctors prescribing opioid pain-killers what they thought before as safe, and regulators imposed to handle a tough situation. Addiction. It’s painful to even read about the skyrocketing numbers of people suffering, thus we decided to map how digital health could help tackle the opioid crisis. Why is it so difficult to deal with the opioid crisis? Once you become addicted, it sticks with you for a long time, if not for life, just as a ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Bioethics Mobile Health Virtual Reality in Medicine AI artificial intelligence data data analytics drugs future gc3 Innovation opioid opioid crisis pharma technology wearables Source Type: blogs
The opioid epidemic knows no boundaries. The epidemic is not limited to race, profession or socioeconomic status. Since 1999, the number of overdose deaths involving opioids (heroin and prescribed opioids) nearly quadrupled with more people dying from drug overdoses in 2014 than recorded in any prior year. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 78 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose. At least half of all opioid overdose deaths involve a prescription opioid. Despite recent initiatives that have been put into place to curb the number of opioid related deaths, such as public availabilit...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
The physician role in reducing opioid medication misuse, overdose and death is an important one. Several new policies were put into place by physician delegates at the 2016 AMA Annual Meeting addressing factors that are critical  to reversing the epidemic, including prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMP), access to naloxone and addiction medicine as a sub-specialty. The importance and effectiveness of PDMPs The prevention and treatment of opioid use disorder has been a focus of the AMA’s Task Force to Reduce Prescription Opioid Abuse since its inception. PDMPs are important tools that physicians have t...
Source: AMA Wire - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: news
In the March 18, 2016, AMA Wire Practice Perspective entitled “When Patient Satisfaction Is Bad Medicine” , Drs. Joan Papp (Case Western Reserve University) and Jason Jerry (Cleveland Clinic) make the argument that the institutional drive for higher patient satisfaction scores on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) questionnaires may be contributing to the opioid prescription drug crisis nationwide. They note the results of an Ohio State Medical Association-Cleveland Clinic Foundation survey 1,100 Ohio physicians: … 98 percent of the physicians who participated rep...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care Pharmaceuticals drug safety patient care syndicated Source Type: blogs
by Tom QuinnIn case you didn’t notice, the US Centers for Disease Control published their long-awaited (dreaded?) “CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.” It made a pretty big splash: Five editorials plus the full Guideline in the online Mar 15 JAMA, front page New York Times feature article, the first hour on NPR’s “Diane Rehm Show,” (Mar 17) and multiple others. It is specifically aimed at primary care prescribers, who write about half of the scripts for opioids in the US. It is intended to “support clinicians caring for patients outside the context of active can...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - Category: Palliative Care Tags: CDC ethics opioids pain quinn The profession Source Type: blogs
The dramatic increase in overdose deaths due to opioids has been a major focus of political and medical leaders over the last few months, and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention recently released new guidelines for practitioners to think twice before prescribing opioid medications for their patients. The guidelines, which are voluntary, ask primary care providers who are treating adults with chronic pain to consider alternatives to prescription painkillers such as oxycodone and hydrocodone, to limit treatment length, and to monitor their patients to see if the opioids are the best choice for them. Even though...
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Tuesday released clinical guidelines for prescribing opioids to help combat the nation’s overdose epidemic, and physicians were swift to respond. Physicians are embracing the concepts for reducing harm but simultaneously are pointing out serious shortcomings that will need to be addressed. What’s in the guidelines The guidelines, which were published in JAMA and on the CDC website, are intended for primary care clinicians who treat adult patients for chronic pain in outpatient settings. Their main goals are to help physicians improve communic...
Source: AMA Wire - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: news
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a guideline for clinicians who are prescribing opioids for chronic pain that is not associated with cancer, palliative care, or end-of-life care. The guideline is intended to ensure that clinicians and patients consider safer and more effective treatment options for pain management, improve patient outcomes, and reduce the number of people who develop opioid use disorder, overdose, or experience other adverse events related to these drugs.“The new guideline really points out the dangers of the liberal prescribing of opioids,” said Petros Levounis, ...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: addiction Centers for Disease Control and Prevention opioid overdose prescription drug abuse primary care Source Type: research
In an effort to curb America's deadly opioid crisis, federal health officials are urging doctors to largely avoid prescribing highly addictive painkillers like OxyContin and Vicodin when treating patients for chronic pain. The new guidelines, issued Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, are directed at primary care providers, who issue about half of all opioid prescriptions.  Since 1999, such prescriptions and sales have quadrupled in the United States, a boom that the CDC said has "helped create and fuel" the current epidemic of opioid abuse and overdose. In 2012 alone, d...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Physicians, medical organizations and public health experts around the nation all have shared reasons why the opioid overdose epidemic must be top of mind in the medical world, and it comes down to one focus—the patient. A panel of experts recently gave recommendations that lead the way to making patient-focused pain management possible. Reducing the stigma of chronic pain One important aspect of the efforts to combat the opioid epidemic is reducing stigma so that patients with chronic pain do not lose access to the care that they need. “What is our role as physicians in this current problem?” asked...
Source: AMA Wire - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Source Type: news
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