Taking an anticlotting drug? If you need a procedure, be prepared

Millions of people with cardiovascular disease take drugs that help prevent blood clots, which can lodge in a vessel and choke off the blood supply to part of a leg, lung, or the brain. These potentially lifesaving medications include warfarin (Coumadin) and a class of drugs called non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants or NOACs. Examples include dabigatran (Pradaxa) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto). However, if you’re taking one of these drugs and need an invasive procedure — anything from a tooth extraction to a hip replacement — managing the risks can be tricky, says cardiologist Dr. Gregory Piazza, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “There’s a higher-than-normal risk of bleeding during and after the procedure, because your blood doesn’t clot as easily,” he says. But stopping an anticlotting drug is also risky. Doing so increases the chance of a blood clot, especially if you have surgery, which also leaves you more prone to a clot. “Walking the tightrope between these two extremes can be a challenge for clinicians,” says Dr. Piazza. They need to consider if, when, and how long a person might need to stop taking their anticlotting medication. And the answer hinges on many different factors. Different risk levels Each year, about one in 10 people taking a NOAC requires a planned invasive procedure. These include diagnostic tests and treatments that require a doctor to use an instrument to enter the ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Surgery anticlotting drug anticlotting drugs Source Type: blogs

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