New combination therapy of registered drugs shortens anti-Wolbachia therapy

(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM's Research Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics have found a way of significantly reducing the treatment required for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis from several weeks to seven days. By targeting Wolbachia, a bacterial symbiont that the filarial parasites need to live, the team has discovered a drug synergy that enables effective treatment over a shorter time.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news

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Onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are two neglected tropical diseases that together affect ∼157 million people and inflict severe disability. Both diseases are caused by parasitic filarial nematodes with elimination efforts constrained by the lack of a safe drug that can kill the adult filaria (macrofilaricide). Previous proof-of-concept human trials have...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
Onchocerciasis, or river blindness, is a dermal filariasis caused by infection with the nematode parasite Onchocerca volvulus, transmitted to humans through the bites of blackflies of the genus Simulium. Despite ...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
by Arathi Arakala, Christopher M. Hoover, John M. Marshall, Susanne H. Sokolow, Giulio A. De Leo, Jason R. Rohr, Justin V. Remais, Manoj Gambhir Progress towards controlling and eliminating parasitic worms, including schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, and lymphatic filariasis, is advancing rapidly as national governments, multinational NGOs, and pharmaceutical companies launch collaborative chemotherapeutic control campaigns. Critical questi ons remain regarding the potential for achieving elimination of these infections, and analytical methods can help to quickly estimate progress towards—and the probability of achie...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionKeen observation on the part of physicians is mandatory during the administration of ivermectin for quick recognition and prevention of this adverse drug reaction.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00790998.FindingsBetween April 22, 2009, and Jan 23, 2011, we enrolled and allocated 998 participants to moxidectin and 501 participants to ivermectin. 978 received moxidectin and 494 ivermectin, of which 947 and 480 were included in primary efficacy outcome analyses. At 12 months, skin microfilarial density (microfilariae per mg of skin) was lower in the moxidectin group (adjusted geometric mean 0·6 [95% CI 0·3–1·0]) than in the ivermectin group (4·5 [3·5–5·9]; difference 3·9 [3·2–4·9], p
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
In conclusion, African medicinal plants are a potential source of lead compounds for drug discovery and the production of phytopharmaceuticals in the management of devastating parasitic diseases. There is a need to apply traditional medicine knowledge in clinical applications via value addition.
Source: Journal of Herbal Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Cristina Ballesteros, James F. Geary, Charles D. Mackenzie, Timothy G. GearyAbstractLymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are neglected parasitic diseases which pose a threat to public health in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Strategies for control and elimination of these diseases by mass drug administration (MDA) campaigns are designed to reduce symptoms of onchocerciasis and transmission of both parasites to eventually eliminate the burden on public health. Drugs used for MDA are pred...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00790998.FindingsBetween April 22, 2009, and Jan 23, 2011, we enrolled and allocated 998 participants to moxidectin and 501 participants to ivermectin. 978 received moxidectin and 494 ivermectin, of which 947 and 480 were included in primary efficacy outcome analyses. At 12 months, skin microfilarial density (microfilariae per mg of skin) was lower in the moxidectin group (adjusted geometric mean 0·6 [95% CI 0·3–1·0]) than in the ivermectin group (4·5 [3·5–5·9]; difference 3·9 [3·2–4·9], p
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
In conclusion, African medicinal plants are a potential source of lead compounds for drug discovery and the production of phytopharmaceuticals in the management of devastating parasitic diseases. There is a need to apply traditional medicine knowledge in clinical applications via value addition.
Source: Journal of Herbal Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: August 2018Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance, Volume 8, Issue 2Author(s): Cristina Ballesteros, James F. Geary, Charles D. Mackenzie, Timothy G. GearyAbstractLymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis are neglected parasitic diseases which pose a threat to public health in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Strategies for control and elimination of these diseases by mass drug administration (MDA) campaigns are designed to reduce symptoms of onchocerciasis and transmission of both parasites to eventually eliminate the burden on public health. Drugs used for MDA are pred...
Source: International Journal for Parasitology: Drugs and Drug Resistance - Category: Parasitology Source Type: research
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