New combination therapy of registered drugs shortens anti-Wolbachia therapy

(Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine) Researchers from LSTM's Research Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics have found a way of significantly reducing the treatment required for lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis from several weeks to seven days. By targeting Wolbachia, a bacterial symbiont that the filarial parasites need to live, the team has discovered a drug synergy that enables effective treatment over a shorter time.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news

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Answer toParasite Case of the Week 580:Loa loamicrofilariae. As noted by several readers, the nuclei go to the tip of the tail, the microfilariae are relatively large, and there is faint evidence of a sheath, all of which are characteristic features for this species. As I teach my students, the nuclei " flow-a flow-a " (to the tip) in Loa loa. Another memory trick from William Sears is that the nuclei go " lower and lower " in Loa loa. Take your pick for your favorite! Remember that the sheath will not always be seen. Size is a more definitive feature in differentiating Mansonella spp. from th...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs
Abstract Plateau and Nasarawa states in central Nigeria were endemic for onchocerciasis. The rural populations of these two states received annual ivermectin mass drug administration (MDA) for a period of 8-26 years (1992-2017). Ivermectin combined with albendazole was given for 8-13 of these years for lymphatic filariasis (LF); the LF MDA program successfully concluded in 2012, but ivermectin MDA continued in areas known to have a baseline meso-/hyperendemic onchocerciasis. In 2017, serological and entomological assessments were undertaken to determine if MDA for onchocerciasis could be stopped in accordance with...
Source: The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Trop Med Hyg Source Type: research
The genus Onchocerca Diesing, 1841 includes species of medical importance, such as O. volvulus (Leuckart, 1893), which causes river blindness in the tropics. Recently, zoonotic onchocercosis has been reported in ...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are targeted for elimination, primarily using mass drug administration at the country and community levels. Elimination of transmission is the onchocerciasis target and global elimination as a public health problem is the end point for lymphatic filariasis. Where program duration, treatment coverage, and compliance are sufficiently high, elimination is achievable for both parasites within defined geographic areas. However, transmission has re-emerged after apparent elimination in some areas, and in others has continued despite years of mass drug treatment. A critical question is whet...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Anti-Wolbachia therapy for onchocerciasis &lymphatic filariasis: Current perspectives. Indian J Med Res. 2019 Jun;149(6):706-714 Authors: Wan Sulaiman WA, Kamtchum-Tatuene J, Mohamed MH, Ramachandran V, Ching SM, Sazlly Lim SM, Hashim HZ, Inche Mat LN, Hoo FK, Basri H Abstract Onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (LF) are human filarial diseases belonging to the group of neglected tropical diseases, leading to permanent and long-term disability in infected individuals in the endemic countries such as Africa and India. Microfilaricidal drugs such as ivermectin and albendazole have been used as t...
Source: Indian J Med Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Indian J Med Res Source Type: research
Onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis are two neglected tropical diseases that together affect ∼157 million people and inflict severe disability. Both diseases are caused by parasitic filarial nematodes with elimination efforts constrained by the lack of a safe drug that can kill the adult filaria (macrofilaricide). Previous proof-of-concept human trials have...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
Onchocerciasis, or river blindness, is a dermal filariasis caused by infection with the nematode parasite Onchocerca volvulus, transmitted to humans through the bites of blackflies of the genus Simulium. Despite ...
Source: Parasites and Vectors - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
by Arathi Arakala, Christopher M. Hoover, John M. Marshall, Susanne H. Sokolow, Giulio A. De Leo, Jason R. Rohr, Justin V. Remais, Manoj Gambhir Progress towards controlling and eliminating parasitic worms, including schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, and lymphatic filariasis, is advancing rapidly as national governments, multinational NGOs, and pharmaceutical companies launch collaborative chemotherapeutic control campaigns. Critical questi ons remain regarding the potential for achieving elimination of these infections, and analytical methods can help to quickly estimate progress towards—and the probability of achie...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionKeen observation on the part of physicians is mandatory during the administration of ivermectin for quick recognition and prevention of this adverse drug reaction.
Source: Journal of Medical Case Reports - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00790998.FindingsBetween April 22, 2009, and Jan 23, 2011, we enrolled and allocated 998 participants to moxidectin and 501 participants to ivermectin. 978 received moxidectin and 494 ivermectin, of which 947 and 480 were included in primary efficacy outcome analyses. At 12 months, skin microfilarial density (microfilariae per mg of skin) was lower in the moxidectin group (adjusted geometric mean 0·6 [95% CI 0·3–1·0]) than in the ivermectin group (4·5 [3·5–5·9]; difference 3·9 [3·2–4·9], p
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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