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Long-Term Acupuncture Therapy for Low-Income Older Adults with Multimorbidity: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perceptions

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine , Vol. 0, No. 0.
Source: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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A couple of weeks ago, I was interviewed by the a reporter from the Georgetown student newsletter about its integrative medicine program. It got me to thinking how delusion that one’s work is science-based can lead to collaborations with New Age “quantum” mystics like Deepak Chopra. "Integrative medicine" doctors engaging in what I like to refer to as quackademic medicine all claim to be "evidence-based" or "science-based." The words apparently do not mean what integrative medicine academics think they mean. The post Quackademic medicine versus being “science-based&rdqu...
Source: Respectful Insolence - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Bad science Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture Aviad Haramati Chopra Center Deepak Chopra featured Georgetown University Hakima Amri homeopathy Source Type: blogs
Most oncology patients are using some form of complementary alternative medicine (CAM). These can include acupuncture, massage, yoga, homeopathy, energy work, spiritual healers, vitamins and supplements, mind-body interventions, diets, and many other modalities. Although many of these interventions are safe and beneficial, some of them can be harmful. Unfortunately, because of time constraints, knowledge deficits, and the acuity of our patients, assessment of the use of CAM is often overlooked. As nurse practitioners, we must educate ourselves about the evidence for safety and efficacy of these interventions.
Source: The Journal for Nurse Practitioners - Category: Nursing Authors: Tags: Feature Article Source Type: research
Authors: Bonapace J, Gagné GP, Chaillet N, Gagnon R, Hébert E, Buckley S Abstract OBJECTIVE: To review the evidence relating to nonpharmacological approaches in the management of pain during labour and delivery. To formulate recommendations for the usage of nonpharmacological approaches to pain management. OPTIONS: Nonpharmacological methods available for pain management during labour and delivery exist. These should be included in the counselling and care of women. EVIDENCE: PubMed and Medline were searched for articles in French and English on subjects related to "breastfeeding," &...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine , Vol. 0, No. 0.
Source: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions • The available evidence suggests that efficacious complementary therapies exist that target all 3 orders of neurons and, therefore, the authors recommend multimodal individualized treatment for each patient. There is high interindividual variability between patients in responses to treatments. PMID: 29428928 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Altern Ther Health Med Source Type: research
Saliva is fundamental to our oral health and our well-being. Many factors can impair saliva secretion, such as adverse effects of prescribed medication, auto-immune diseases (for example Sj ögren’s syndrome) an...
Source: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Conclusions: Acupuncture and acupressure showed large effect size with significantly poor or inferior quality of included trials for enhancing bowel function in cancer patients after surgery. Further well-powered evidence is needed. PMID: 29422935 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health is a group dedicated to promoting "integrative medicine" in medical academia that has, unfortunately, been very successful over the last two decades. Recently, it published a report that promotes acupuncture as a tool to combat the opioid epidemic Let's just put it this way. The ACIMH exaggerates the evidence rather obviously. The post The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health: Exaggerating the evidence for acupuncture to make it appear to be more than an elaborate placebo appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE.
Source: Respectful Insolence - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health acupuncture Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 5 February 2018 Source:Life Sciences Author(s): Haiyang Fu, Jianhua Sun, Yong Tan, Huifang Zhou, Wanli Xu, Junling Zhou, Dong Chen, Cong Zhang, Xuanxuan Zhu, Ying Zhang, Xiaoliang Wu, Zhaoqing Xi Aims Acupuncture is frequently recommended as a complementary therapy for infertility. However, whether acupuncture can prevent early ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome has not been examined and its potential mechanisms are not well understood. Main methods Forty rats were randomized into four groups: Control, Ovarian Stimulation Model, Acupuncture, and Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG). Serum e...
Source: Life Sciences - Category: Biology Source Type: research
Abstract Low back and pelvic girdle pain (LBPGP) is a common complaint among pregnant women, which increases throughout pregnancy and women use various complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to manage their pain. Using an online survey, CAM treatments used by pregnant women in the UK and their perceptions of these therapies to relieve LBPGP were investigated. 191 women completed the survey and 70% experienced LBPGP lasting more than one week. Over half of women who sought treatment from a GP or physiotherapist were dissatisfied. 25% of participants used CAM during pregnancy, the most popular being ...
Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Complement Ther Clin Pract Source Type: research
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