Neuroborreliosis in Swedish Children: A Population-based Study on Incidence and Clinical Characteristics

Background: Borrelia burgdorferi is a common cause of bacterial meningitis, but there are very few studies on incidence in Europe. The aim of this study was to report the incidence and symptoms of neuroborreliosis in Swedish children. Methods: Medical records of children (
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research

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We report nine cases of pediatric neuroborreliosis collected by the National Observatory of Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis in France between 2001 and 2012. The nine children, aged 4-13 years, were identified in northern and eastern France and had the following clinical features: meningeal irritation alone or with facial palsy, or isolated facial palsy. All cases showed anti-Borrelia antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid or serum, or with a positive Borrelia PCR in the CSF. The outcome was favorable in all cases after a 2- to 3-week course of third-generation cephalosporin. On the basis of these nine pediatric cases, this study...
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
We report the case of a 9-year-old girl who suffered from headaches for several days and was shown to have opsoclonus and left peripheral facial palsy. Work-up excluded the diagnosis of neuroblastoma, but CSF analysis showed aseptic meningitis, and serology for Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme) was positive. The outcome was favorable with complete regression of symptoms after treatment with ceftriaxone 2g/day for 3 weeks. Although rare, the diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis must be raised in the presence of isolated opsoclonus, particularly if the clinical picture is incomplete and if other features, such as peripheral fac...
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
We report rare manifestation of a common disease and emphasize the importance of considering LD in the differential diagnosis of acute transverse myelitis, particularly in residents of endemic areas.
Source: IDCases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Neurologic manifestations of nervous system infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia garinii, and Borrelia afzelii are qualitatively similar, and include lymphocytic meningitis, cranial neuritis, radiculoneuritis, and other focal or multifocal mononeuropathies. Parenchymal central nervous system (CNS) infection occurs rarely. Neurobehavioral changes are common, but are rarely evidence of CNS infection. Diagnosis requires likely exposure and a finding with high diagnostic positive predictive value, specifically erythema migrans, or laboratory support, typically positive 2-tiered serologic testing. CNS infection is ofte...
Source: Neurologic Clinics - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
B. miyamotoi was detected in Ixodes scapularis ticks in Connecticut in 2001 [2], but the first human case in the United States was not reported until 2013 [3]. Unlike with Lyme disease, patients in the United States with B. miyamotoi infections typically do not have skin lesions and instead present with a non-specific febrile illness, potentially associated with leukopenia, thrombocytopenia and elevated liver function tests [4]. Highly immunocompromised patients may develop chronic meningitis [3].
Source: The American Journal of Medicine - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2018Source: Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases, Volume 9, Issue 5Author(s): Mateusz Markowicz, Anna-Margarita Schötta, Michael Kundi, Petra Bogovič, Katarina Ogrinc, Franc Strle, Gerold StanekAbstractThe aims of the study were to determine and compare the concentration of CXCL13 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) and various other neurological disorders applying a Luminex based assay and ELISA, and to find factors associated with CXCL13 concentration. CSF samples obtained from four clinically well-defined groups of patients (proven LNB, suspected LNB, tick-born...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Conclusion: CSF CXCL13 is a sensitive marker of LNB in children. The specificity to discriminate LNB from non-Lyme aseptic meningitis may be more moderate, suggesting that CSF CXCL13 should be used together with other variables in diagnosing LNB in children.
Source: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Original Studies Source Type: research
is the most common tick-borne illness in the USA and Europe. Pathogens involved are Borrelia burgdorferi in the USA and B. afzelii and B. garinii in Europe. The characteristic rash of erythema migrans occurs in approximately 75% of patients. Neurological disease, including facial palsy, meningoencephalitis, aseptic meningitis and polyradiculopathy, occurs in 10 –15%. Cardiac disease, primarily manifest as heart block, is seen in 1–2%. Arthritis is seen as a late complication in about 30%.
Source: Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Bacterial infections Source Type: research
Conclusions:Although mechanical causes are high in the differential diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy, Lyme disease is well-known to have symptoms of radiculitis and should be considered in the assessment of cervical pain. A typical early syndrome due to neuroborreliosis has been characterized as a triad of the symptoms mentioned above including radicular pain, cranial or peripheral paresis, and lymphocytic meningitis and is called "Bannwarths syndrome" (Bannwarth, 1941).Disclosure: Dr. Hannoun has nothing to disclose. Dr. Gudin has received personal compensation for activities with Purdue, Endo, Astra Zeneca, ...
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Autoimmunity with Infection, Syphilis, Lyme, Tuberculosis, and other Bacteria Source Type: research
We describe a case of bilateral simultaneous facial nerve palsy associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in a 3-year-old boy. Several symptoms led to the diagnosis of EBV infection: the clinical situation (fever, stomachache, and throat infection), white blood cell count (5300/mm(3) with 70% lymphocyte count), seroconversion with EBV-specific antibodies, lymphocytic meningitis, and a positive blood EBV polymerase chain reaction (9.3×10(3) copies of EBV-DNA). An MRI brain scan showed bilateral gadolinium enhancement of the facial nerve. A treatment plan with IV antibiotics (ceftriaxone) and corticosteroids w...
Source: Archives de Pediatrie - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Arch Pediatr Source Type: research
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