Bullous Skin Lesions in a Patient with End-Stage Renal Disease and Hepatitis C.

We present a female patient with end-stage renal disease, bullous skin lesions affecting mainly sun-exposed areas, and high ferritin levels. She also had hepatitis C. Her serum porphyrin panel was suggestive of porphyria cutanea tarda. Skin biopsy excluded inflammatory pathologies. Phlebotomy during each hemodialysis, continuation of darbepoetin, and avoidance of any further doses of intravenous iron, with close monitoring of hemoglobin, resulted in a gradual drop in ferritin level and improvement of the skin lesions. PMID: 28988591 [PubMed]
Source: Advances in Peritoneal Dialysis. Conference on Peritoneal Dialysis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Adv Perit Dial Source Type: research

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We report a case of PCT in the setting of cigarette usage and untreated hepatitis C infection.
Source: Dermatology Online Journal - Category: Dermatology Source Type: research
We report a case of PCT in the setting of cigarette usage and untreated hepatitis C infection. PMID: 32045169 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Dermatol Online J - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatol Online J Source Type: research
We describe the case of a 36 years old female patient suffering from prolonged morphea with difficult management, who was recently diagnosed of Hepatitis C Virus and received direct-acting antiviral agents treatment with Hepatitis C Virus clearance. Skin lesion faded away in a short period after successful therapy. PMID: 31696725 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revista Espanola de Enfermedades Digestivas - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Rev Esp Enferm Dig Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 9 May 2019Source: Molecular Genetics and MetabolismAuthor(s): Jordi To- FiguerasAbstractPorphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) arises from a deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) in the liver. Several exogenous risk factors are associated with the acquired form of the disease. In Southern Europe, PCT is strongly linked to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to the point that a high prevalence of viral infection in some geographic areas generated an increase of PCT cases as a complication. In spite of the association, PCT was a rare complication of HCV infection, thus suggesting the exi...
Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
'Gene silencing' spares patients the crippling pain of intermittent porphyria Related items fromOnMedica Higher cancer risk from chronic diseases Hepatocellular carcinoma risk, cirrhosis and hepatitis C Kidney disease hits 850 million people Commonest genetic mutation causes much morbidity Prevention screening for one third of population
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 18 January 2019Source: Molecular Genetics and MetabolismAuthor(s): Ashwani K. SingalAbstractPorphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is the most common human porphyria, due to hepatic deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), which is acquired in the presence of iron overload and various susceptibility factors, such as alcohol abuse, smoking, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, HIV infection, iron overload with HFE gene mutations, use of estrogens, and UROD mutation. Patients with familial or type II PCT due to autosomal dominant UROD mutation also require other susceptibility factors, as ...
Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 28 November 2018Source: Molecular Genetics and MetabolismAuthor(s): Yedidyah Weiss, Brenden Chen, Makiko Yasuda, Irina Nazarenko, Karl E. Anderson, Robert J. DesnickAbstractPorphyria Cutanea Tarda (PCT) is a hepatic cutaneous porphyria due to the hepatic inhibition of the heme biosynthetic enzyme uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD), and can occur either in the absence or presence of an inherited heterozygous UROD mutation (PCT subtypes 1 and 2, respectively). A heterozygous UROD mutation causes half-normal levels of UROD activity systemically, which is a susceptibility factor but is not...
Source: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
A 56-year-old woman with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), cirrhosis, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) was referred for evaluation. On examination, she had multiple painful vesicular lesions that progressed to crusting (Figure A). Laboratory results showed HCV genotype 1a with a viral load of 92,200 IU/mL. Plasma porphyrin levels were increased as follows: hexacarboxylporphyrin, 6.1 ug/L; heptacarboxylporphyrin, 41.5 ug/L; coproporphyrin, 1.8 ug/L; uroporphyrin, 129.2 ug/L; and total plasma porphyrin, 181.4 ug/L.
Source: Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Electronic Image of the Month Source Type: research
PMID: 28755733 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Med Sci Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: HCV treatment regimens including interferon or ribavirin may precipitate PCT relapse. Hydroxychloroquine may be useful to prevent such relapses. In this limited experience, DAA were not associated with PCT relapse. Studies are needed to examine DAA as a primary PCT treatment in HCV-infected patients. PMID: 28641714 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of the Medical Sciences - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Am J Med Sci Source Type: research
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