Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Effects of butylphthalide on cognitive decline in diabetic rats.

Effects of butylphthalide on cognitive decline in diabetic rats. Mol Med Rep. 2017 Oct 03;: Authors: Tian Z, Wang J, Wang Y, Zhang M, Zhou Y Abstract Butylphthalide, a component extracted from seeds of Chinese celery, is an effective neuroprotective agent used for the treatment of ischemic stroke and dementia. Diabetes may cause central nervous system damage, and diabetes is closely associated with dementia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of butylphthalide on cognitive impairment in a streptozotocin‑induced diabetic rat model, and the underlying mechanisms of action. A total of 30 healthy male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following 2 groups: Normal control (NC; n=10) and diabetes model (DM) groups (n=20). Diabetes was induced in rats in the DM group by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin, and these rats were further subdivided into the following 2 groups: Diabetic control (n=10) and butylphthalide‑treated groups (n=10). Following 8 consecutive weeks of treatment, a Morris water maze test was performed and the levels of blood fasting plasma glucose (FPG), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA) and tumor necrosis factor‑α (TNF‑α), interleukin (IL)‑1β, and IL‑6 inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus were measured. FPG levels were significantly decreased in the butylphthalide‑treated group when compared with the DM group. In addition, cognitive deficit...
Source: Molecular Medicine Reports - Category: Molecular Biology Tags: Mol Med Rep Source Type: research

Related Links:

Background and Purpose—Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with diseases of the brain, kidney, and vasculature. However, the relationship between T2DM, chronic kidney disease, brain alterations, and cognitive function after stroke is unknown. We aimed to evaluate the inter-relationship between T2DM, impaired renal function, brain pathology on imaging, and cognitive decline in a longitudinal poststroke cohort.Methods—The TABASCO (Tel Aviv brain acute stroke cohort) is a prospective cohort of stroke/transient ischemic attack survivors. The volume and white matter integrity, ischemic lesions, and brain a...
Source: Stroke - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Diabetes, Type 2, Cognitive Impairment, Ischemic Stroke, Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Original Contributions Source Type: research
Conclusions There remain opportunities for improving prevention in patients at risk for cardiovascular events. Our study identified certain patient subgroups that may benefit from interventions to enhance medication adherence, particularly by minimizing treatment gaps and discontinuation of statin therapy within the first year of treatment.
Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Semin Neurol 2017; 37: 316-325 DOI: 10.1055/s-0037-1603468Cerebral small vessel disease can cause either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Accounting for up to 25% of all strokes, it is also the second biggest contributor to the risk of dementia, and is the most common incidentally discovered finding on brain imaging. There are two main causes of cerebral small vessel disease: arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease (with hypertension as the main modifiable risk factor) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (predominantly caused by β-amyloid deposits limited to the cerebral small arteries, arterioles, and capilla...
Source: Seminars in Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
This study aimed to estimate associations between combined measurements of BMI and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with mortality and incident coronary artery disease (CAD). This study followed 130,473 UK Biobank participants aged 60-69 years (baseline 2006-2010) for 8.3 years (n = 2974 deaths). Current smokers and individuals with recent or disease-associated (e.g., from dementia, heart failure, or cancer) weight loss were excluded, yielding a "healthier agers" group. Ignoring WHR, the risk of mortality for overweight subjects was similar to that for normal-weight subjects. However, among normal-weight subjects...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
It’s no secret that alcohol affects our brains, and most moderate drinkers like the way it makes them feel — happier, less stressed, more sociable. Science has verified alcohol’s feel-good effect; PET scans have shown that alcohol releases endorphins (the “pleasure hormones”) which bind to opiate receptors in the brain. Although excessive drinking is linked to an increased risk of dementia, decades of observational studies have indicated that moderate drinking — defined as no more than one drink a day for women and two for men — has few ill effects. (A drink equals 1.5 ounces of 80...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Brain and cognitive health Healthy Eating Heart Health Memory Source Type: blogs
This study is the first to show that downregulation of PAPP-A expression in adult mice can significantly extend life span. Importantly, this beneficial longevity phenotype is distinct from the dwarfism of long-lived PAPP-A KO, Ames dwarf, Snell dwarf and growth hormone receptor (GHR) KO mice with germ-line mutations. Thus, downregulation of PAPP-A expression joins other treatment regimens, such as resveratrol, rapamycin and dietary restriction, which can extend life span when started in mice as adults. In a recent study, inducible knockdown of the GHR in young adult female mice increased maximal, but not median, lif...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Conclusion The researchers used data from a large ongoing cohort study to look for links between consumption of sugary and artificially sweetened drinks and risk of stroke or dementia. This cohort study benefits from the large overall sample size, long period of data collection, careful and valid diagnostic assessments, and adjustments for a number of confounders. However, care must be taken when interpreting these results – particularly if latching on to the maximal tripled risk figures reported in the media. There are several points to consider: Small numbers The new number of strokes and dementia in this study was...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news
Objective:Intracranial arterial stenosis (ICAS) is responsible for ischemic strok and dementia. Most studies on risk factors for these vascular lesions have been conducted in symptomatic patients. The present study aims to determine the prevalence of ICAS and its risk factors using magnetic resonance angiography in an asymptomatic population in Shunyi District in Northern rural China.Background:The present study is a part of the ongoing community-based Shunyi Study in China.Design/Methods:Stroke-free participants older than 35, who completed brain MRI and MRA, were included. ICAS was graded as: no stenosis,
Source: Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Cerebrovascular Disease and Interventional Neurology: Epidemiology Source Type: research
More News: Brain | China Health | Dementia | Diabetes | Endocrinology | Ischemic Stroke | Neurology | Stroke | Study