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Diabetes and dementia MIRACLE treatment from DEADLY snails

TREATMENTS for diabetes and dementia could be made from the poison of lethal snails, scientists have found.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Hot on the heels of headlines linking alcohol consumption with longer life comes new research that casts a much more sobering light on drinking. According to an analysis of more than 1 million people—the largest study of its kind to date—scientists say that heavy alcohol use is the biggest modifiable risk factor for dementia, especially early-onset forms of the disease. The findings, which are published in The Lancet Public Health, came as a shock to the researchers involved. “We hypothesized that alcohol would play some role, but I don’t think anyone expected the size of the effect to be so large,&...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Research Source Type: news
This study is the longest, prospective randomized controlled trial that has documented the physiological effects of supervised, structured exercise training in a group of sedentary but healthy middle-aged adults. The key finding is that 2 years of exercise training performed for at least 30 minutes, 4 to 5 days per week, and including at least 1 high-intensity interval session per week results in a significant reduction in LV chamber and myocardial stiffness. The use of high-resolution, invasively measured LV pressure-volume curves and comparison with an attention control group enhances the confidence in this conclusion. T...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Up until the first half of the twentieth century, large-scale health disasters were mostly due to natural causes (earthquakes, volcanoes, hurricanes, etc.) or infections (e.g., smallpox, influenza epidemics, cholera). But something peculiar happened as we entered the second half of the century: Health disasters due to natural causes became dwarfed by large-scale health disasters that are man-made. Here’s a list of the Six Worst U.S. Health Disasters of the Last 50 Years, mostly man-made phenomena that have exacted huge tolls: widespread disease, premature death, poorly managed (though nonetheless highly profitable fo...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle autoimmune gluten grain-free grains Inflammation low-carb Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
View Original Article Here: Nursing Home Signs You May Not Be Noticing As the population ages, more family members find themselves taking care of elderly parents, grandparents or other loved ones. It can be difficult to care for loved ones while working, caring for your children, and keeping up with social commitments. You will likely arrive at a crossroads where you’re forced to ask “when is it time for assisted living?” While many family members do not want to consider committing their loved ones to an institution like an assisted living facility or a nursing home, it isn’t always possible to mov...
Source: Shield My Senior - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Senior Safety Source Type: blogs
This study assessed the prevalence of grey hair in patients with coronary artery disease and whether it was an independent risk marker of disease. This was a prospective, observational study which included 545 adult men who underwent multi-slice computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography for suspected coronary artery disease. Patients were divided into subgroups according to the presence or absence of coronary artery disease, and the amount of grey/white hair. The amount of grey hair was graded using the hair whitening score: 1 = pure black hair, 2 = black more than white, 3 = black equals white, 4 = white more t...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study teaches us that poor wound healing and wrinkling and sagging that occur in aging skin share similar mechanisms." Reduced cell cohesiveness of outgrowths from eccrine sweat glands delays wound closure in elderly skin Human skin heals more slowly in aged vs. young adults, but the mechanism for this delay is unclear. In humans, eccrine sweat glands (ESGs) and hair follicles underlying wounds generate cohesive keratinocyte outgrowths that expand to form the new epidermis. Our results confirm that the outgrowth of cells from ESGs is a major feature of repair in young skin. Strikingly, in aged s...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: This study highlights the utility of administrative database to compare and follow population health status considering healthcare use. Specific Public Health policies are justified for FOT, taking into account the specific context of each FOT, the necessity of prevention initiatives and screening to reduce the frequency of the chronic diseases. PMID: 27238162 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Revue d Epidemiologie et de Sante Publique - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Rev Epidemiol Sante Publique Source Type: research
It may seem unlikely, but a small and growing body of evidence suggests that regular meditation can indeed slow ageing, at least at a cellular levelDo people who meditate age more slowly? It seems unlikely on the face of it. How could sitting immobile with one’s eyes closed, perhaps focusing on the breath, possibly keep the Grim Reaper at bay? That said, the Buddha – surely the archetypal meditator – is reputed to have lived to 80, which must have been an exceptionally ripe old age in 5th century BCE India. And according to Buddhist scriptures, even after 80 years in this realm of existence, in the end it...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Ageing Science Meditation Health & wellbeing Source Type: news
You may have heard of Dry January, a campaign run in the U.K. by Alcohol Concern. To promote alcohol awareness, it involves (as you’ve likely gathered) completely abstaining from alcohol for the month of January. It’s a valuable campaign with noble intentions, but a minority of participants may unfortunately miss the wider point. A month of strict abstinence does lead some to drink more than they should come February 1. Remaining alcohol free for a month is an achievement which deserves to be rewarded, but compensatory drinking is not what Dry January is trying to advocate. A healthy attitude towards consu...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Alcoholism General Healthy Living Substance Abuse Abstinence Alcohol Abuse Alcoholic beverage Binge Drinking Drinking culture Liver disease Liver health Long-term effects of alcohol Moderation National Council on Alc Source Type: news
Jennifer shared her “before” and “after” photos after just 3 weeks of following the Wheat Belly lifestyle: “I am 30. I have been dealing with health issues my whole life. About a month ago, I had to go to the ER for severe abdominal pain and nausea. I still don’t know all that is going on, but I do know the Wheat Belly diet is helping me to get better (docs haven’t been helpful thus far). “This is a pic of me before Wheat Belly on the left and 3 weeks after starting the diet. I have followed your Facebook and seen all the ‘before’ and ‘afters’ and wan...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Success Stories abdominal pain gluten grains nausea Source Type: blogs
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