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Midday Light Therapy May Improve Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Bipolar Disorder

Adjunctive bright light therapy may help lower depressive symptoms in adults with bipolar disorder, reports astudy published yesterday inAJP in Advance.“Despite advances in drug treatment for mania, the development of effective pharmacotherapy for bipolar depression remains a challenge,” wrote Dorothy Sit, M.D., of the University of Pittsburgh and colleagues. “Given the limited treatment options, research to investigate novel therapeutics for bipolar depression is a high-priority public health concern.”Much like patients with major depression, people with bipolar disorder commonly report sleep problems and lethargy, which suggests they may have disrupted circadian rhythms. These circadian problems could benefit from light therapy. The study included 46 adults with bipolar I or II disorder with symptoms of major depression (Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Depression Scale With Atypical Depression Supplement [SIGH-ADS] score of 20 or more), but not mania or mixed symptoms. These patients were randomly assigned to either a 7,000-lux bright white light or 50-lux dim red placebo light unit, which they agreed to use daily at home or work. All patients started with a 15-minute light session between noon and 2:30 p.m. that increased by 15 minutes each week to a target dose of 60 minutes daily. Sit and colleagues chose midday light since it tends to have a subtler effect on circadian rhythms, allowing for better mood with less risk of slee...
Source: Psychiatr News - Category: Psychiatry Tags: ajp in advance bipolar depression bipolar disorder circadian rhythm Dorothy Kit light therapy SIGH-ADS sleep Source Type: research

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Conclusions rs7713917 influenced brain grey and white matter structure and function in BD, long term effects of lithium on white matter structure, and antidepressant response to chronotherapeutics, thus suggesting that glutamatergic neuroplasticity and Homer 1 function might play a role in BD psychopathology and response to treatment.
Source: Progress in Neuro Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
It’s that time of year again when the highly sensitive types among us who thrive with lots of sunlight begin to wither with the plants as the sun begins to hide. Not only do we get less vitamin D (and deficiencies have been linked to depression), but the change in sunlight affects our circadian rhythm — the body’s internal biological clock that governs certain brain activity and hormone production. In some people, the change of mood-related chemicals can cause seasonal affective disorder (SAD), also known as winter blues or seasonal depression. For an episode of major depression to be class...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Alternative and Nutritional Supplements Bipolar Depression Holiday Coping Mental Health and Wellness Roundup Self-Help Light therapy Sad Sadness Seasonal Affective Disorder Seasonal Depression seasonal depressive disorder Vitamin Source Type: blogs
By Christian Jarrett The clocks have gone back and there’s a chill in the air. It’s well known that during these darker months, a significant minority of us experience unwelcome negative changes to our mood (at least if you believe in the notion of Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD, which not all experts do). Now an intriguing study in Psychiatry Research has explored the link this condition may have with another psychiatric diagnosis, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The results suggest that people with OCD are more likely than average to experience seasonal effects on their mood, and that for these ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Mental health Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: The data from this study provide robust evidence that supports the efficacy of midday bright light therapy for bipolar depression. PMID: 28969438 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The American Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Am J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Benedetti F, Poletti S, Hoogenboezem TA, Locatelli C, de Wit H, Wijkhuijs AJM, Colombo C, Drexhage HA Abstract BACKGROUND: The clinical relevance of raised levels of circulating cytokines in bipolar disorder is still unclear. Cytokines influence neurotransmitters, neuroplasticity, and white matter integrity. An inconsistent literature suggests that higher cytokine levels could hamper antidepressant response. Total sleep deprivation (TSD) and light therapy (LT) prompt a rapid antidepressant response and can provide a model treatment to study predictors of response. METHODS: We studied at baseline 15 imm...
Source: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Tags: J Clin Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Martiny K Abstract Hypothesis The hypotheses of all the four included studies share the common idea that it is possible to augment the effect of antidepressant drug treatment by applying different interventions and with each intervention attain a clinically meaningful better effect compared to a control condition, and with minor side effects, thus improving the short- and medium-term outcome in major depression. Procedures Study design The basic study design has been the double blind randomised controlled trial (RCT). In the light therapy study, all patients were treated with sertraline for the whole of th...
Source: Danish Medical Journal - Category: Journals (General) Tags: Dan Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: March 2017 Source:European Psychiatry, Volume 41 Author(s): P. Canali, S. Casarotto, M. Rosanova, G. Sferrazza-Papa, A.G. Casali, O. Gosseries, M. Massimini, E. Smeraldi, C. Colombo, F. Benedetti When directly perturbed in healthy subjects, premotor cortical areas generate electrical oscillations in the beta range (20–40Hz). In schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (BD), these oscillations are markedly reduced, in terms of amplitude and frequency. However, it still remains unclear whether these abnormalities can be modulated over time, or if they can be still observed after ...
Source: European Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Canali P, Casarotto S, Rosanova M, Sferrazza-Papa G, Casali AG, Gosseries O, Massimini M, Smeraldi E, Colombo C, Benedetti F Abstract When directly perturbed in healthy subjects, premotor cortical areas generate electrical oscillations in the beta range (20-40Hz). In schizophrenia, major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder (BD), these oscillations are markedly reduced, in terms of amplitude and frequency. However, it still remains unclear whether these abnormalities can be modulated over time, or if they can be still observed after treatment. Here, we employed transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) c...
Source: Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Psychiatry Source Type: research
James Phelps’ new book, A Spectrum Approach to Mood Disorders: Not Fully Bipolar But Not Unipolar—Practical Management, is written for professionals, not laymen. I have some familiarity with bipolar disorder and its causes, symptoms, and treatments. However, I am not a professional and this book often goes beyond my ability to comprehend. Dr. Phelps has been treating patients and studying and writing about mood disorders for over 25 years, but he makes assumptions that the reader has a higher level of experience or training, and it makes this book difficult for amateurs to fully appreciate. The basic premise of...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Antidepressants Anxiety Attention Deficit Disorder Bipolar Book Reviews Borderline Personality Depression Disorders General Mood Stabilizers Postpartum Depression Professional Psychiatry Psychological Assessment Psychology PT Source Type: news
Bipolar disorder is one of the most difficult illnesses to treat because by addressing the depression part of the illness, you can inadvertently trigger mania or hypomania. Even in Bipolar II, where the hypomania is less destabilizing than the often-psychotic manic episodes of Bipolar I, persons often experience from a debilitating depression that can’t be lifted by mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. Antidepressants, though, can cause a person with bipolar to cycle between hypomania and depression. I have worked with psychiatrists who were too afraid of cycling to risk using antidepressants for bipolar patients. Th...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Mania Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Sleep Antidepressant Antipsychotic Bipolar Disorder Depression Hypomania Mood Disorder Mood Stabilizers Rapid Cycling Sleep Deprivation Sleep Hygiene Source Type: blogs
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