Complicated Recovery Awaits Victims Injured in Vegas Attack

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Their concert turned into a siege, and now their lives may become a battle. The staggering count of people injured in the shooting at a Las Vegas music festival means their recoveries are likely to be as varied as the victims themselves. Some injuries are as simple as broken bones, others gunshot wounds involving multiple surgeries and potential transplants, and all come with the added emotional scars of enduring the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, with 59 killed. At least 130 people remained hospitalized Tuesday, with 48 listed in critical condition. Hospitals said 185 others had already been released. At Sunrise Hospital and Medical Center alone, the count of those treated included 120 people who were struck by gunfire, a glimpse of the amount of ammunition unleashed in the attack. Rehabilitation for the most seriously hurt victims will take far longer than many may realize. "Years," said Dr. Thomas Scalea, physician-in-chief at the University of Maryland's Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, one of the nation's largest trauma centers. "It's not days or weeks." Edward Leon raced to Las Vegas from Palm Springs, California, after learning his niece was shot in the stomach. He said he cried the whole way there. Although she survived an initial operation, he worries about what will come next. "She's out of surgery," he said, "but it's a long road ahead." At the site of the attack, people fashioned stretcher...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Major Incidents News Mass Casualty Incidents Patient Care Source Type: news

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Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
This study suggests that advantages and disadvantages vary by environment and diet, however, which might explain why evolution has selected for multiple haplogroups rather than one dominant haplogroup. This is all interesting, but none of it stops the research community from engineering a globally better-than-natural human mitochondrial genome, and then copying it into the cell nucleus as a backup to prevent the well-known contribution of mitochondrial DNA damage to aging. Further, nothing stops us from keeping the haplogroups we have and rendering the effects of variants small and irrelevant through the development...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Human body is intertwined collection of lives of Individual organs.We believe death occurs when brain dies , respiration stops and circulation ceases . Curiously ,when life ends , these organs  don’t die as a single unit . These three events can happen in any of the six possible permutations.Each organ takes different times to die after loss of life.It is like a crashed computer , where the mother board /RAM memory may be transferred to another and be functional . Out of these three , heart function appears to be supreme as it can function without the need of brain (Science of brain-death) and keep the body...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Heart transplantation donor heart transport transmedics Source Type: blogs
Discussion of Mitochondrial Hormesis as an Approach to Slow Aging Cornelis (Cees) Wortel, Ichor Therapeutics Chief Medical Officer, on Rejuvenation Research and Its Engagement with the Established Regulatory System An Interview with a Programmed Aging Theorist An Interview with Reason at the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation An Interview on Mitochondrial Damage and Dysfunction in Aging An Interview with Vadim Gladyshev on Research into the Causes of Aging An Interview with Jim Mellon, and Update on Juvenescence A Lengthy Interview with Aubrey de Grey of the SENS Research Foundation An Interview with Peter de Keize...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Healthy Life Extension Community Source Type: blogs
In this study, the median age at LT for CFLD was 15.7 years. Notably, 10 of 13 (77%) CF explants had>5% steatosis and 8 of 13 (61.5%) demonstrated variable fibrosis. The median age, sex, type of transplant (liver vs liver-lung), pancreatic insufficiency status, body mass index (BMI) percentile, genotype, and prevalence of diabetes were comparable in those with and without explant steatosis. More than half of allograft biopsies showed significant steatosis (17/31, 54.8%) and lobular inflammation (16/31, 51.6%). Hepatocyte ballooning was less frequent (5/31, 16.1%). Overall, 6 patients (46.2%) had allograft steatosis that...
Source: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: Original Articles: Hepatology Source Type: research
Purpose of review There is great variability in how different organ allografts respond to the same tolerance induction protocol. Well known examples of this phenomenon include the protolerogenic nature of kidney and liver allografts as opposed to the tolerance-resistance of heart and lung allografts. This suggests there are organ-specific factors which differentially drive the immune response following transplantation. Recent findings The specific cells or cell products that make one organ allograft more likely to be accepted off immunosuppression than another are largely unknown. However, new insights have been made ...
Source: Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation - Category: Surgery Tags: TRANSPLANT IMMUNOLOGY: REJECTION, TOLERANCE AND HISTOCOMPATIBILITY: Edited by Paolo Cravedi Source Type: research
Hospitals exist to take care of sick people, with the goal of making them better.  Hospitals employ and work with health care professionals, again who are sworn to put taking care of patients ahead of all other concerns.However, since we foundedHealth Care Renewal, we have noted striking examples of hospital leaders threatening their hospitals'fundamental mission and/or health care professionals'core values, which we dubbedmission-hostile management.  We also saw mission-hostile management affecting the broader health care industry, particularly pharmaceutical and device companies.  Most recently, the most s...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Management Tags: hospitals imperial CEO managerialism mission-hostile management perverse incentives Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, this is the first report to show that pyroptotic cell death occurs in the aging brain and that the inflammasome can be a viable target to decrease the oxidative stress that occurs as a result of aging. Reducing Levels of Protein Manufacture Slows Measures of Aging in Nematodes https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2018/12/reducing-levels-of-protein-manufacture-slows-measures-of-aging-in-nematodes/ Researchers here demonstrate that an antibiotic slows aging in nematode worms, providing evidence for it to work through a reduction in protein synthesis. Beyond a slowing of aging, one of the con...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Abstract A large number of liver transplants have been performed for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and recurrence is increasingly encountered. The recurrence of HCC after liver transplantation is notoriously difficult to manage. We hereby propose multi-disciplinary management with a systematic approach. The patient is jointly managed by the transplant surgeon, physician, oncologist and radiologist. Immunosuppressants should be tapered to the lowest effective dose to protect against rejection. The combination of a mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor with a reduced calcineurin inhibitor could be considered wit...
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS Management by dedicated intensivists will improve not only the number of actual organ donors, but also the number of harvested organs. PMID: 30510153 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Transplantation - Category: Transplant Surgery Authors: Tags: Ann Transplant Source Type: research
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