Childhood Amnesia in Children: A Prospective Study Across Eight  Years

This was a prospective study of earliest memories across 8 years for 37 children who were of age 4–9 years initially. In three interviews (initial and after 2 and 8 years) children provided their three earliest memories; those from earlier interviews that were not spontaneously provided later were cued. There was little consistency in the earliest memory or overlap across interviews in spontaneous memories. The youngest group also forgot over half their initial memories although few were forgotten by older children. For consistency of content, 25%–32% of information by former 6‐ to 9‐year‐olds was the same after 8 years, but
Source: Child Development - Category: Child Development Authors: Tags: Empirical Article Source Type: research

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...The questions in Simpson’s newest book illuminate the bond between two generations of women — one just entering adulthood; the other approaching the years when one wonders how much of life remains. Are you afraid of dying? How do you want to be remembered? Is there anything that you really regret or wish you did differently when you were younger? What do you hope to live to see? These are the questions asked and answered with love and wisdom. Read the full article on HealthCentral about how generations of women can connect so profoundly: Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with rea...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
AbstractAlzheimer ’s disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder which can contribute to memory loss and cognitive damage in the elderly; moreover, evidence from clinical and animal studies demonstrated that AD always exhibit severe cognitive deficits. However, the effects of donepezil medications on cogni tion are controversial. Additionally, it is unclear whether donepezil can protect neurons to improve cognitive function through the brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF)/tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) signalling pathway in the tree shrew (TS), which has a closer evolutionary relationship to pri mates ...
Source: Metabolic Brain Disease - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Dear Carol: My dad is in a good assisted living facility. He’s 96, and other than congestive heart failure, he’s in fair health for his age and has a good attitude for the most part. He was having physical therapy for hip and knee problems but now refuses it. I feel that at his age he can do what he wants so I haven’t pushed it. He uses a wheelchair to get around for the most part, but he can transfer himself. The nurse at the ALF said that he’d probably qualify for hospice care, though a doctor would have to make the determination. She did say that it’s a good idea for us to check into hospic...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) Exercise has been known to be essential for overall health. In a study carried out by researchers at the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland, the benefits of exercise on brain health have been emphasized. Researchers found that exercise can help preserve brain cells and prevent loss of memory, cognitive problems, and general problems in...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
AbstractVarious side effects associated with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) which is used for cryopreservation of bone marrow or peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) have been reported. Among the central nervous system side effects the epileptic seizures, stroke, transient and temporary leucoencephalopathy, and global amnesia are well known. Herein we report a 52-year-old man who experienced tonic –clonic seizure within minutes after the initiation of DMSO cryopreserved autologous PBPC infusion. Unfortunately, he also developed cardiac arrest and required intubation for ventilation after the seizure. Pathophysiology ...
Source: Cell and Tissue Banking - Category: Stem Cells Source Type: research
An article in the Daily Mail speaks to this issue in a delightful manner, stressing that people have differing views about addressing our elders at any time but particularly when they are in need of care. One view is that pet names such as Sweetie are demeaning. This attitude comes from a woman whose family wasn’t used to terms of endearment. The opposing view is from a woman completely comfortable with these terms and finds that they encourage bonding. My own view? It depends. Read the full article on HealthCentral about the effect of pet names on older people and leaving the ball in their court: Support a caregiver...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Condition:   Dementia Interventions:   Behavioral: 3D-RT;   Behavioral: RT-Verbal Sponsors:   Moai Technologies LLC;   St. Louis University;   University of Montana Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
For many of us, a car is a sign of independence. But this emotional connection to our automobiles is part of what makes convincing a person that he or she is no longer capable of driving such a volatile battle. The longer adult children or others wait to discuss driving issues with a loved one, the harder it can be. Read more on HealthCentral about how to help memory-impaired loved ones stop driving: MedicareFAQ – Medicare Resource Center Support a caregiver or jump-start discussion in support groups with real stories - for bulk orders of Minding Our Elders e-mail Carol        ...
Source: Minding Our Elders - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Source Type: blogs
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
Margaret Daffodil Graham tries to live a healthy life, particularly since she has a health issue that requires constant attention. Like more than 100 million other Americans, the 74-year-old from Winston-Salem, N.C., has high blood pressure, and she has been taking medication to control it since she was in her 30s. So when she read that her nearby hospital, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, was looking for people with hypertension to volunteer for a study, she quickly signed up, knowing the doctors would monitor her blood pressure more intensively and hopefully lower her risk of developing heart disease and stroke. What...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Aging Alzheimer's Research Source Type: news
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