Whooping cough vaccination in pregnancy to continue

The advice reflects new data on vaccine effectiveness and safety published by PHE and the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).
Source: NHS Networks - Category: UK Health Authors: Source Type: news

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If you haven’t had a tetanus booster shot in the past decade, your doctor may recommend getting one. Many people think of a tetanus shot as something you only need if you step on a rusty nail. Yet even in the absence of a puncture wound, this vaccine is recommended for all adults at least every 10 years. But why? A group of researchers recently questioned whether you need to repeat tetanus vaccines on a regular schedule. What is a tetanus booster? Booster shots are repeat vaccinations you receive after your first series of immunizations as a child. Protection from certain vaccines can wane over time, which is why doc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Men's Health Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
Right now, many people are hoping for a vaccine to protect against the new coronavirus. While that’s still on the horizon, new research suggests that families who do vaccinate their children may not be following the recommended schedule. Vaccines are given on a schedule for a reason: to protect children from vaccine-preventable disease. Experts designed the schedule so that children get protection when they need it — and the doses are timed so the vaccine itself can have the best effect. When parents don’t follow the schedule, their children may not be protected. And yet, many parents do not follow the sc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Parenting Vaccines Source Type: blogs
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
PMID: 31889662 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Anales de Pediatria - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: An Pediatr (Barc) Source Type: research
Influenza and pertussis cause substantial disease burden among pregnant women and infants too young to be vaccinated.
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - Category: American Health Tags: Adult Vaccinations Infant Health Influenza (Flu) Influenza Vaccination MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Pertussis Pertussis Vaccination Pregnancy Vaccines Whooping cough Source Type: news
Only one-third of pregnant women get flu and Tdap shots, despite the fact they vaccines lower the risks that they and their babies will be hospitalized for the infections, worrying CDC data revel.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
About two-thirds of pregnant women in the United States don't get vaccinated against both flu and whooping cough, putting them and their newborns at risk, a new report from the CDC says.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Millions do not, and they may be endangering their babies as well as themselves. Only 35 percent of pregnant women get both vaccines; about half get one.
Source: NYT - Category: American Health Authors: Tags: Whooping Cough Women and Girls Vaccination and Immunization Pregnancy and Childbirth Babies and Infants Influenza Centers for Disease Control and Prevention your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news
(CNN) — Most pregnant women in the United States don’t get flu and whooping cough vaccines even though the shots are safe and recommended as part of routine prenatal care, a report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The report said the low rates of vaccination during pregnancy could put moms-to-be and newborns at greater risk of infection, hospitalization and death. The two vaccinations pass on antibodies to the fetus that provide protection after birth, when babies are too young to be vaccinated. It added that pregnant women have more than double the risk of hospitalization if...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health News Syndicated CBSN Boston CNN Flu Vaccine Pregnancy Whooping Cough Source Type: news
Most pregnant women in the United States don't get flu and whooping cough vaccines even though the shots are safe and recommended as part of routine prenatal care, a report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday.
Source: CNN.com - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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