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Computer-Aided Analysis: Obesity Affects Sperm Quality and Quantity Computer-Aided Analysis: Obesity Affects Sperm Quality and Quantity

Advanced semen-analysis measures adverse impact of obesity on sperm quality, quantity, and morphology in couples seeking infertility treatment; weight loss should be a priority when potential father has a BMI of 30 or higher.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology News Source Type: news

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We examined relationships between maternal age (modeled flexibly to allow curvilinear shapes) and pregnancy outcomes using logistic regression. We plotted absolute predicted risks to display curves from age 20 to 50 estimated for two risk profiles: (1) population average values of all risk factors; (2) a low-risk profile without preexisting diabetes/hypertension, smoking, prior spontaneous/therapeutic abortion, diagnosed infertility, inadequate prenatal care, low income, rural residence, or obesity. Results: Risks of hypertensive disorders increased gradually until age 35, then accelerated. Risk of multiple gestations, ...
Source: Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Reproductive and Perinatal Source Type: research
(Natural News) According to the results of a study, women who take metformin, a common diabetes medication, could be putting their children at increased risk of being obese or overweight. More pregnant women with gestational diabetes or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are taking metformin to treat their conditions. PCOS usually causes infertility, and the condition can put...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Recent studies have suggested a role for abdominal obesity in male infertility. Previous studies have found that cell apoptosis exerts an important role in obesity-related male infertility. C1q/TNF-related protein 3 (CTRP3), a paralog of adiponectin, has been proposed to exert anti-apoptotic effects and to attenuate diabetes-related cardiac injuries. However, the role of CTRP3 in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced spermatogenic impairment remains unclear. In the present study, we fed male mice a HFD for 24 weeks to induce obesity. The expression of CTRP3 was decreased by HFD feeding. Supplementation with the recombinant human glo...
Source: Clinical Science - Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Tags: PublishAheadOfPrint Source Type: research
Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Authors: Lazaridou S, Dinas K, Tziomalos K Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. PCOS is not only the leading cause of anovulatory infertility but is also associated with an array of metabolic disorders, among which impaired glucose metabolism has been a topic of intense research. The aim of the present narrative review is to summarize the findings of the studies that have evaluated the prevalence and incidence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients with PCOS, to analyze the factors underpinning the association between T2DM ...
Source: Hormones - Category: Endocrinology Tags: Hormones (Athens) Source Type: research
In conclusion, women with polycystic ovary syndrome are at an elevated risk of coronary artery disease. Preventive interventions should be provided to them, particularly for those with the comorbidity of metabolism symptom. PMID: 29492235 [PubMed]
Source: Oncotarget - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncotarget Source Type: research
Authors: El Salam MAA Abstract Obesity is a highly prevalent non-communicable disease worldwide and is commonly associated with male infertility. Several etiopathological theories have been mentioned in the literature by which obesity affects spermatogenesis, thus affecting the male fertility potential. Mechanisms for explaining the effect of obesity on male infertility include endocrinopathy, increased aromatization activity, associated erectile dysfunction, psychological and thermal effects, obstructive sleep apnea, increased leptin and oxygen free radicals, and associated inflammatory and obstructive elements of...
Source: Oman Medical Journal - Category: Middle East Health Tags: Oman Med J Source Type: research
(Natural News) You might want to skip the receipt the next time you buy something. According to a recent study, over “90 percent of receipts contain chemicals linked to infertility, autism and type-2 diabetes.” Dubbed the “gender-bending” chemical, Bisphenol A (BPA) and the “healthier alternative” called Bisphenol S (BPS) are used on 93 percent of...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Until recently, research on parental health in humans has focused largely on associations with fertility measures and pregnancy. With the exception of maternal diabetes mellitus and obesity, those studies that extend to infant outcomes most commonly involved maternal exposures to environmental or pharmaceutical toxins. The effects of paternal exposures and health on infant outcomes are much less studied than maternal effects. Work in experimental and domestic species has demonstrated that preconception parental health can affect pregnancy outcomes and offspring characteristics, even across multiple generations.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Huixiao Hong Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) can mimic natural hormone to interact with receptors in the endocrine system and thus disrupt the functions of the endocrine system, raising concerns on the public health. In addition to disruption of the endocrine system, some EDCs have been found associated with many diseases such as breast cancer, prostate cancer, infertility, asthma, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, and diabetes mellitus. EDCs that binding androgen receptor have been reported associated with diabetes mellitus in in vitro, animal, and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize the st...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
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