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#OpioidAwareChat

In 2015 there were 33,091 opioid-related deaths in the US. Every day, more than 90 Americans die after overdosing on opioids. ER visits and opioid overdose-related deaths have more than quadrupled in the last 15 years. September is National Recovery Month. Join us this Friday for a Twitter chat hosted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to discuss opioid use disorder and ways to prevent and treat it. NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins, NIDA Director Dr. Nora Volkow, NINDS Director Dr. Walter J. Koroshetz, special guest American Society of Addiction Medicine, and several other NIH and HHS components will be responding to questions about the opioid crisis and how the government is working to combat it. Use #OpioidAwareChat to join and help promote. September 29, 11:00am -Noon PT.  
Source: Dragonfly - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: News from NLM Public Libraries Source Type: news

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When I was 12, my father got into a bicycle accident resulting in traumatic brain injury. Although I was unaware of it at the time, this day became the first day of the rest of my life. Despite having never seen either of my parents so much as have a sip of wine with dinner, I watched my father spiral into a crippling alcohol addiction that wreaked havoc on our lives. As I entered my rebellious teenage years, I learned an important lesson: addiction fuels in others a desire to be overly accommodating, even as they simultaneously ignore a dire situation until it becomes intolerable — often, way too late. The media has...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Conditions Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
(TRENTON, N.J.) — New data show that the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year. They showed their biggest drop in 25 years. The decline comes amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction. A health data firm released a report Thursday showing a 9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. The U.S. is estimated to consume roughly 30 percent of all opioids used worldwide. ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — New data show that the number of prescriptions for opioid painkillers filled in the U.S. fell dramatically last year. They showed their biggest drop in 25 years. The decline comes amid increasing legal restrictions and public awareness of the dangers of addiction. A health data firm released a report Thursday showing a 9 percent average drop nationwide in the number of prescriptions for opioids filled by retail and mail-order pharmacies. All 50 states and the District of Columbia had declines of more than 5 percent. The U.S. is estimated to consume roughly 30 percent of all opioids used worldwid...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news
Every day, we wake up to new headlines about the nation ’s worsening opioid crisis. Every day, dozens of people struggle with or die from their addictions. Prescription drug overdose is the leading cause of accidental death in the United States. Opioid addiction can happen to anyone at any age. Oregon and Washington rank No. 1 and No. 2 respectively n ationally for those aged 65 and older hospitalized for overdoses. Three Oregonians die on average every week from prescription overdoses. These statistics…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: news
Abuse-deterrent opioid formulations have been suggested as one way to decrease the abuse, addiction, and overdose of orally prescribed opioids. Ten oral opioid formulations have received abuse-deterrent labeling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Their properties consist of physical and/or chemical means by which the pills resist manipulation and create a barrier to unintended administration, such as chewing, nasal snorting, smoking, and intravenous injection. In this review, we describe the mechanisms of abuse-deterrent technology, the types of premarketing studies required for FDA approval, the pharmacology ...
Source: Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: research
To the Editor Drs Kolodny and Frieden outlined steps the government should take to curb the opioid epidemic, such as improving surveillance of prescribers through the use of databases, improving reporting and responses to overdoses, promoting more cautious guidelines for use of narcotics, increasing access and reimbursement for nonopioid and nonpharmacologic management of pain, interrupting supply of heroin and illicitly produced synthetic opioids, increasing access to addiction treatment, and reducing harm to current users. However, they left out the role the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) can play in its ability t...
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
The U.S. surgeon general, Dr. Jerome Adams, recently issued the first national public health advisory in 13 years. He wants more civilians to start carrying naloxone “to help combat the nation’s opioid crisis and save lives.” Since 2010, the number of Americans who die from opioid overdoses annually has more than doubled, and in 2016 there were more than 42,000 deaths. The need for a multifaceted strategy to combat this deadly epidemic is clear. Among many EMS providers, there’s a great deal of angst directed at civilian naloxone distribution programs, as well as at opioid overdoses in general. If y...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care Administration and Leadership Source Type: news
Notice of final rule revising the Medicare Advantage (MA) program (Part C) regulations and Prescription Drug Benefit program (Part D) to implement provisions designed to reduce beneficiary misuse or overdose of opioids as part of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA). Includes information on changes to improve program integrity policies related to payments in MA, Medicare cost plan, Part D, and PACE programs, among other things. Also includes CMS's response to comments submitted on the final rule, including its effect on small and rural providers. The rule will be effective on June 15, 2018.
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - Category: Rural Health Source Type: news
Conclusion Chairman Burgess indicated that he is still deciding whether to combine numerous opioid-related bills into a single legislative package or try to move the bills through committee individually. Chairman Burgess noted that it is possible to put all of the legislation together in one package, but added that part of him “wants to consider them as individual bills so that, as we go through at least the subcommittee markup and the full committee markup, there will be ample opportunity for people’s ideas to be heard.”        
Source: Policy and Medicine - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 1 March 2018 Source:EXPLORE Author(s): Heather Tick, Arya Nielsen, Kenneth R. Pelletier, Robert Bonakdar, Samantha Simmons, Ronald Glick, Emily Ratner, Russell L. Lemmon, Peter Wayne, Veronica Zador Medical pain management is in crisis: from the pervasiveness of pain to inadequate pain treatment, from the escalation of prescription opioids to an epidemic in addiction, diversion and overdose deaths. The rising costs of pain care and managing adverse effects of that care has prompted action from state and federal agencies including the DOD, VHA, NIH, FDA and CDC. There is pressure for pain...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
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