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Three or more cups of coffee daily halves mortality risk in patients with both HIV and HCV

(Elsevier) Patients infected by both HIV and hepatitis C virus are at specific risk of end-stage liver disease and greater risk of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In addition, HIV infection accelerates the progression of chronic hepatitis C to fibrosis and development of cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. In these HIV-HCV co-infected patients, drinking at least three cups of coffee each day halved the risk of all-cause mortality according to a new study published in the Journal of Hepatology.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) comprising non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), together with their complications of cirrhosis, liver failure and liver cancer will be the predominant liver disease for the conceivable future. Traditionally, viral hepatitis has been the focus of basic and clinical research, and the bread and butter for clinicians in the field. However, with the advent of therapies that suppress hepatitis B virus replication and the shift in standard of care for the treatment of hepatitis C to highly effective direct acting antivirals, the focus of clinical prac...
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
ConclusionsChronic HCV infection is generally a progressively expensive condition.
Source: Journal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Research Paper Source Type: research
Abstract As more than 80% of hepatocellular carcinoma patients in Japan also suffer from hepatitis C virus infections some time in their medical history, identifying genetic aberrations associated to hepatitis C virulence in these individuals remains a high priority in the diagnosis and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. From the BioBank Japan Project, we acquired 480 subjects of hepatocellular carcinoma, chronic hepatitis and liver cirrhosis, and genotyped 131 clinically relevant host single nucleotide polymorphisms to survey the potential association between certain risk alleles and genes...
Source: International Journal of Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Int J Oncol Source Type: research
This study aims to describe the clinical characteristics of HCV-infected patients during initial presentation to tertiary care in Malaysia, a middle-income Asian country, to inform the development of a national guideline.
Source: Value in Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Source Type: research
We enter an era when NASH is becoming a main cause of liver mortality and morbidity: a main cause of cirrhosis, a main cause of decompensated cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease [1], a main cause of primary liver cancer[2,3], a main cause of listing for liver transplantation [1,4]. It took a long time for this to be accepted ([5 –8]) although there was precedent with hepatitis C: as surprising as it may seem nowadays, back one to two decades ago, arguments have been raised against HCV infection as a significant cause of serious liver disease [9–11].
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Testa Liver cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death. The major forms of primary liver cancer are hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA). Both these tumors develop against a background of cirrhotic liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic liver damage and fibrosis. HCC is a heterogeneous disease which usually develops within liver cirrhosis related to various etiologies: hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (frequent in Asia and Africa), hepatitis C virus (HCV), chronic alcohol abuse, or metabolic syndrome (frequent in Western countries). In cirrhosis, hepa...
Source: Cancers - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Review Source Type: research
Authors: Ghouri YA, Mian I, Rowe JH Abstract Since the 1970s, the epidemic of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has spread beyond the Eastern Asian predominance and has been increasing in Northern hemisphere, especially in the United States (US) and Western Europe. It occurs more commonly in males in the fourth and fifth decades of life. Among all cancers, HCC is one of the fastest growing causes of death in the US and poses a significant economic burden on healthcare. Chronic liver disease due to hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus and alcohol accounts for the majority of HCC cases. Incidence of nonalcoholic fatty...
Source: Journal of Carcinogenesis - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: J Carcinog Source Type: research
Abstract Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with cancer. Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have changed HCV treatment paradigms, but little is known about the management of HCV infection in patients with cancer. The substantial burden of HCV infection and the inconclusive evidence regarding its detection and management in patients with cancer prompted the authors to review the literature and formulate recommendations. Patients for whom HCV screening is recommended included all patients with hematologic malignancies, hemat...
Source: Clinical Lymphoma and Myeloma - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: CA Cancer J Clin Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by progressive liver damage and fibrosis, which can lead to liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma [1]. In 2013, an estimated 357,800 people worldwide died from HCV-related cirrhosis, and an additional 342,500 people died from liver cancer caused by HCV [2]. The burden of HCV-associated liver disease is projected to continue to increase in many countries in the coming decades [3].
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Source Type: research
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by progressive liver damage and fibrosis, which can lead to liver failure or hepatocellular carcinoma.1 In 2013, an estimated 357,800 people worldwide died from HCV-related cirrhosis, and an additional 342,500 people died from liver cancer caused by HCV.2 The burden of HCV-associated liver disease is projected to continue to increase in many countries in the coming decades.3
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
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