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The Baby of a Mother Who Refused Chemo to Give Birth Has Died

(DETROIT) — The baby born of a Michigan woman who chose to forgo chemotherapy to give birth to the child has died, a relative said Thursday. Sonya Nelson said her niece, Life Lynn DeKlyen, died Wednesday evening at the University of Michigan Hospital in Ann Arbor. Life’s mother, Carrie DeKlyen, died Sept. 9, three days after giving birth to her sixth child. Relatives said Life had been doing better than expected after being born prematurely at 1 pound, 4 ounces (567 grams). Nelson told The Associated Press the baby had good and bad days at the hospital, but “took a turn for the worse” this week. “We don’t have any answers,” Nelson said, adding “the cards were kind of stacked against her” after being born at 24 weeks and five days into the pregnancy — about “the earliest you can survive.” “Maybe Carrie needed her,” Nelson said. “It is comforting for us to know that she went home to be with Carrie.” Carrie DeKlyen declined to participate in a clinical trial or undergo treatment for the brain cancer, because it would have meant ending her pregnancy. Her husband, Nick DeKlyen, has said their decisions were rooted in their Christian faith. The DeKlyens are from the western Michigan city of Wyoming. They have five other children who range in age from 2 to 18 years old. “Our deepest sympathies go to the DeKlyen family during this time of sorrow,” hospital officials said in a s...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized APW Michigan onetime Source Type: news

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Not long ago, Zika virus was dominating headlines. A new infection was hardly ever heard about before then, yet is now affecting hundreds of thousands of people in Latin America, causing disfiguration and microcephalia in new-born babies. Microcephalia is caused by severe delayed and abnormal development of the brain, resulting in the range of intellectual disability, dwarfism, poor motor functions and speech. With no cure or even preventive vaccination available, many women in the most affected regions were reportedly considering postponing any planned pregnancies. The virus was actually discovered back in 1947 in Zika fo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Brain and Behavior Brain Blogger Health-related Publishers Research brain cancer Delivery glioblastoma Immune System microcephalia Pregnancy Sexual Contact stem cells Zika virus Source Type: blogs
A 47-year-old woman with metastatic, poorly differentiated lung cancer with neuroendocrine features was brought to the hospital after 4 days of nausea, vomiting, disorientation, and 1 generalized tonic clonic seizure. On examination, her blood pressure was 148/95 mm Hg, heart rate 95 bpm, and temperature 36.4°C. She was encephalopathic and had cortical blindness. She had no history of seizures or visual impairment. MRI brain without contrast showed changes consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES; figure, A). She had been on nivolumab, of which she had received 2 doses; the last dose was 24 da...
Source: Neurology Clinical Practice - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: MRI, Other cerebrovascular disease/ Stroke, All Clinical Neurology, Chemotherapy-tumor Case Source Type: research
Doctors say Carrie DeKlyen chose to forgo chemotherapy to treat her brain cancer since it would have meant ending her pregnancy
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(DETROIT) — A Michigan woman who sacrificed the chance to prolong her life in order to give birth to her sixth child has died. Nick DeKlyen tells The Associated Press that his wife, Carrie DeKlyen, died early Saturday surrounded by family. He says among the last things he said to her were, “I’ll see you in Heaven.” Doctors removed Carrie DeKlyen’s feeding and breathing tubes on Thursday, a day after she gave birth to her daughter Life Lynn DeKlyen. The mother chose to forgo chemotherapy to treat her brain cancer, since it would have meant ending her pregnancy. Life Lynn was born prematurely an...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized APW Detroit onetime Source Type: news
Conclusion This is an interesting piece of research that shows how knowledge in one field of medicine can sometimes be applied to another field with surprising results. But it's important to be realistic about the stage of research. This is very much a "proof of concept" study, and tests on cells, tissues and mice don't necessarily translate into a safe and effective treatment for humans. The study has several limitations, but the fact the treatment so far hasn't been tested on humans is the most important. For one thing, Zika virus doesn't naturally infect mice, so researchers had to use a specially engineered v...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news
Conclusion: Patients with LEP had significant differences and disparities in end-of-life decision-making. Interventions to facilitate informed decision-making for those with LEP is a crucial component of care for this group. THU 1:30 pm:  “But She’ll Die if You Don’t!”: Understanding and Communicating Risks at the End of Life (Janet Malek) Clinicians sometimes decline to offer interventions even if their refusal will result in an earlier death for their patients. For example, a nephrologist may decide against initiating hemodialysis despite a patient’s rising creatinine levels if dea...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs
Nursing is not the kind of profession one goes into seeking fame and prestige. Ask any of the nurses in your life, and they’ll all tell you the same story: It involves long hours and hard work, with little acknowledgement of the day-to-day sacrifices. And yet, according to a U.K. survey, nurses are among the world’s most satisfied professionals, along with teachers and engineers, of those who most enjoy their jobs. That’s because, despite the stress and burnout, there’s a shared sense of purpose among those who work in healthcare. In addition to the time and energy they sacrifice to care for their p...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
David Fajgenbaum has nearly died five times. He’s had his last rites read to him, and he knows he could relapse at any moment. Still, the 32-year-old doctor doesn’t waste energy on self-pity. He can’t. He’s too busy trying to find a cure for the rare disease that’s come so close to killing him. “I realized that if I didn’t dedicate the rest of my life to trying to cure this disease, that no one else was going to do it,” Fajgenbaum said. “I didn’t have many more shots.” When Fajgenbaum was 25 and in his third year at the Perelman School of Medicine at t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Ongoing Clinical Trials Source Type: research
Although the surprise outcome of the presidential race overshadowed coverage of the 2016 election, there were some notable public health gains made in states across the country, particularly on the West Coast. States voted to increase taxes on harmful consumer goods like sugar-sweetened beverages and cigarettes, and approved measures to ensure that people in pain have agency over their treatment.     In case you missed it, here are five public health measures that passed during Tuesday’s election: 1. In a blow to the soda industry, four more cities voted to tax sugary drinks Soda taxes swept the ballot in t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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