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Epilepsy drug's safety reviewed over pregnancy risk

Women whose children have been harmed by sodium valproate will give evidence to a European panel.
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Should there be an outright ban or restricted use of valproate in women who could get pregnant? Related items fromOnMedica Antidepressants in pregnancy linked to heightened risk of birth defects Epilepsy drug linked to 4,000 birth defects in France Prenatal exposure to valproate raises risk of autism Hunt announces Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review Include pregnant women in studies, urge researchers
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
According to consultant neurologists, from the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, the controversial medication sodium valproate may be the only effective treatment in certain patients.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Epilepsy is a neurological disorder often associated with seizure that affects ∼0.7% of pregnant women. During pregnancy, most epileptic patients are prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as valproic acid (VPA) to control seizure activity. Here, we show that prenatal exposure to VPA in mice increases seizure susceptibility in adult offspring...
Source: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Biological Sciences Source Type: research
Conclusions Available data are insufficient to draw conclusions regarding ESL use during pregnancy. Although no particular safety problem was identified, ESL exposure during pregnancy will continue to be monitored and evaluated.
Source: Seizure - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study aimed to determine the overall...
Source: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth - Category: OBGYN Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog aka Tropical Travel Trouble 007 When you think tropical medicine, malaria has to be near the top. It can be fairly complex and fortunately treatment has become a lot simpler. This post is designed to walk you through the basic principals with links to more in depth teaching if your niche is travel medicine, laboratory diagnostics or management of severe or cerebral malaria. If you stubbled on this post while drinking a cup of tea or sitting on the throne and want a fe...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Cases Tropical Medicine malaria Plasmodium plasmodium falciparum plasmodium knowles plasmodium malariae plasmodium ovale plasmodium vivax Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Our findings indicated that Chinese adults with epilepsy had various concerns, some of which differed from those observed in Western populations. Concerns about heritability of seizures, marriage, and pregnancy were of greater concern to Chinese patients compared with Western patients while the legal right to drive appeared to be less of a concern to Chinese patients. Patients with controlled seizures may still have many concerns. Chinese physicians should monitor patient concerns even among those whose seizures remain controlled to meet their needs. More time and attention should be given to address these issue...
Source: Epilepsy and Behavior - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Abstract Harmful blooms of domoic acid (DA)-producing algae are a problem in oceans worldwide. DA is a potent glutamate receptor agonist that can cause status epilepticus and in survivors, temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, one-time low-dose in utero exposure to DA was reported to cause hippocampal damage and epileptiform activity, leading to the hypothesis that unrecognized exposure to DA from contaminated seafood in pregnant women can damage the fetal hippocampus and initiate temporal lobe epileptogenesis. However, development of epilepsy (i.e., spontaneous recurrent seizures) has not been tested. In the present s...
Source: Neurotoxicology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Neurotoxicology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Our findings indicated that Chinese adults with epilepsy had various concerns, some of which differed from those observed in Western populations. Concerns about heritability of seizures, marriage, and pregnancy were of greater concern to Chinese patients compared with Western patients while the legal right to drive appeared to be less of a concern to Chinese patients. Patients with controlled seizures may still have many concerns. Chinese physicians should monitor patient concerns even among those whose seizures remain controlled to meet their needs. More time and attention should be given to address these issu...
Source: Epilepsy and Behaviour - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Epilepsy Behav Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Thus, PGB was found to be teratogenic in rats at equivalent therapeutic doses, hence precaution should be taken before prescribing PGB to pregnant women with epilepsy. PMID: 29607783 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Drug Safety - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Drug Saf Source Type: research
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