New treatment for endometriosis on the horizon

Let’s face it: managing your period is a hassle. There’s the cramping, the bloating, the bleeding, and the feeling a little cranky. Not to mention the need to remember to have tampons and ibuprofen on hand. There may also be the bad timing of a special occasion or a tropical vacation that complicates things further. But as aggravating as all this may be, for most women it’s just that: an aggravation, a nuisance that’s pretty easily dealt with. But for about one in 10 women, their period, the week leading up to their period, and in some cases their entire month can be filled with severe cramps and pelvic pain that significantly affect their quality of life. A normal menstrual period for these women brings very painful cramps, chronic pelvic pain, and painful sex. If you are one of the women who experiences these monthly symptoms, there is a good chance you suffer from endometriosis. Here’s what endometriosis is The lining of your uterus (the endometrium) builds up and sheds during your monthly menstrual cycle in response to your changing hormone levels. Endometriosis occurs when this tissue is found outside the uterus, typically on other structures in your pelvis including your ovaries. Although this endometrial tissue is in the wrong place, it acts exactly as if it were in the uterus where it belongs. So it, too, responds to changes in hormones. It builds up and then sheds and bleeds. This causes inflammation and sometimes scarring of the lining ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs

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There is increasing evidence in oncology that pain management contributes to broad quality-of-life improvement. To maximize patient outcomes, pain management is an essential part of oncologic management. The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography (CT)-guided 125I brachytherapy in treating adult cancer pain.
Source: Brachytherapy - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Conclusions Evidence supports the use of ketamine for acute pain in a variety of contexts, including as a stand-alone treatment, as an adjunct to opioids, and, to a lesser extent, as an intranasal formulation. Contraindications for acute pain are similar to those for chronic pain, partly based on the observation that the dosage ranges are similar. Larger studies evaluating different acute pain conditions are needed to enhance patient selection, determine the effectiveness of nonparenteral ketamine alternatives, define optimal treatment parameters, and develop protocols optimizing safety and access to care.
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Special Article Source Type: research
Conclusions Injection speed of LA in the range of 12 to 1800 mL/h did not affect common peroneal nerve block duration. Clinical Trial Registration This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT02801799.
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions The saphenous nerve is an important contributor to postoperative pain after major ankle surgery, with significant clinical pain appearing within 30 minutes after surgery. Clinical Trials Registration This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT02697955.
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
Conclusions The postoperative in-hospital analgesia associated with deep serratus block is as effective (within an acceptable margin) as superficial serratus block following ambulatory breast cancer surgery. These new findings are important to inform both current clinical practices and future prospective studies.
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
Background and Objectives Intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine (DEX) is reported to prolong the analgesic duration after single-shot interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB). However, the effective analgesic dose of IV DEX remains undetermined. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the clinically relevant dose of IV DEX to prolong the analgesic duration of ISBPB. Methods Seventy-two patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery received ISBPB with 15 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine and were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups (n = 18, each): (1) IV normal saline (control), (2) IV DEX 0.5 μg/kg (DEX...
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
Background and Objectives Various animal models have historically been used to study iatrogenic nerve injury during performance of conduction nerve blocks. Our aims were to compare the microstructures of nerves in commonly used species to those of humans and to explore the validity of the extrapolating these findings to humans. Methods High-resolution, light-microscopic images were obtained from cross sections of sciatic nerves at their bifurcation from fresh rat, rabbit, pig, sheep, dog, and human cadavers. Various microanatomical characteristics were measured and compared between the species. P
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
Background and Objectives Potentially broadened indications for spinal anesthesia require increased understanding of the risk factors and prevention measures associated with postdural puncture headache (PDPH). This review is designed to examine the association between spinal needle characteristics and incidence of PDPH. Methods Meta-analysis and metaregression was performed on randomized controlled trials to determine the effect of needle design and gauge on the incidence of PDPH after controlling for patient confounders such as age, sex, and year of publication. Results Fifty-seven randomized controlled trials (n ...
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
Background and Objectives Postoperatively, transplant recipients receive immunosuppressants, as well as sedatives and analgesics. The immunomodulatory effects of these other agents during the induction period following transplantation remain unclear. We aimed to determine whether the agents dexmedetomidine hydrochloride (Dex) and fentanyl (Fen) have immunomodulatory effects during the induction period following heart transplantation (HTx). Methods Fifty mice were used for antinociception tests after administration of Dex and Fen, and T cells from 3 naive animals were used for in vitro lymphocyte transformation test (s...
Source: Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Regional Anesthesia and Acute Pain: Original Articles Source Type: research
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