FDA Issues Warning About Mixing Opioid Addiction Treatments With Other Meds

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration issued new warnings Wednesday about the dangers of combining medication for opioid addiction with anti-anxiety medicines and other drugs that also slow breathing and brain activity. The FDA warned that mixing such drugs can cause difficulty breathing, coma or death, so it should be done with caution. The agency said a growing number of people fighting opioid addiction with methadone or buprenorphine also take other prescription drugs that slow action of the central nervous system. The warning lists several dozen brand-name and generic drugs that could be risky, including Ambien and Lunesta for insomnia, Valium and Xanax for anxiety, muscle relaxers Soma and Zanaflex and antipsychotic drugs Abilify, Invega, Saphris and others. The agency stressed that treating opioid addiction with medication can outweigh those risks and is crucial to curbing the U.S. opioid epidemic, along with counseling, rehabilitation and other support. "Careful management of the patient and coordination of care is recommended," rather than denying use of methadone or buprenorphine, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb wrote in a statement issued with the warning. The FDA recommends that doctors develop detailed treatment plans, warn patients on addiction treatments about the dangers of taking multiple drugs that depress brain activity, try tapering them off those other drugs and monitor them with blood and urine testing. Buprenorphine and me...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

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What is a Benzodiazepine? Benzodiazepines are a prescription drug sedative used to treat a variety of conditions. They are classified as Schedule IV in the Controlled Substances Act. Some of the conditions that Benzodiazepine can treat include: Insomnia Anxiety Seizures Muscle tension Panic disorders When used as prescribed under the supervision of a medical professional, Benzodiazepines can be very useful in the treatment of these disorders. Many people are able to live healthy, happy lives while taking Benzodiazepines to curb the symptoms of their various conditions. However, because of the addictive nature of Benzodia...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Uncategorized benzo benzodiazepines prescription drug abuse prescription drug addiction prescription drug use prescription pills Source Type: blogs
With all the news media accounts and reports from governmental health organizations about the opioid epidemic, including the 70,237 drug overdose deaths in 2017, a newly emerging threat is gaining attention: use and misuse of benzodiazepines, opioid drugs and Z-drugs. Specifically, combining these three drugs can create a deadly combination that snuffs out lives. Benzodiazepine Overdose Deaths on the Rise Benzodiazepines, a class of sedative narcotic drugs including Xanax and Valium used to treat anxiety, insomnia and other disorders and classified as Schedule IV under the Controlled Substances Act by the Drug Enforcement ...
Source: Psych Central - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Addictions Substance Abuse Suicide Source Type: news
​Part 3 in a Four-Part Series​A 26-year-old man presented with fatigue. He complained of body aches, diarrhea, and nausea. His history was significant for chronic back pain, for which he had been prescribed oxycodone that he has taken daily for three years. He reported that he had stopped taking it two days before his visit.He denied other medication or drug use. He was alert but restless and diaphoretic. His ECG showed sinus tachycardia. His labs included a WBC of 12, Hgb of 12, glucose of 89 mg/dL, creatinine of 1.0 mg/dL, sodium of 140 mEq/L, potassium of 3.8 mEq/L, and CK of 140 U/L. He was experiencing opioid with...
Source: The Tox Cave - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs
It will take more than medication alone to win the battle against opioid addiction, and now U.S. clinicians finally have a device-based therapy to help reduce the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. FDA granted a new indication to Innovative Health Solutions for its NSS-2 Bridge nerve stimulator. The new indication was reviewed under FDA's de novo pathway. “There are three approved drugs for helping treat opioid addiction. While we continue to pursue better medicines for the treatment of opioid use disorder, we also need to look to devices that can assist in this therapy,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD. G...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news
"If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading." -- Lao Tzu Over the last few weeks, the CDC, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the president of the United States have all separately hit the emergency button over the subject of chronic pain treatment and opioid pain killers. Concerns over the rising tide of pain killer addiction, accidental overdose deaths, and a carryover effect causing a steep rise in heroin use have made this a "code blue" emergency for Washington. President Obama has made it clear that addressing the opioid epidemic is now an administ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Americans have a sleep problem, and that means we have a work problem. We're getting less and less sleep (especially on work nights), to the point that the CDC has declared sleep deprivation a public health epidemic. Entrepreneurs are particularly susceptible to sleep deprivation given the pressures and massive workloads that are common for business owners of all stripes. But insufficient sleep will cost you in just about every way -- physically, mentally, financially, and on the job. In contrast, high-quality sleep can up your game and give you a competitive edge over the caffeine-addicted zombies wandering the office ha...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
We are living in an epidemic of stress. The people who walk into my office on a daily basis - busy successful New Yorkers with full lives and a lot going on -- look to the world like they have it all. But more often than not they are deeply stressed out. They are not alone. In 2011, nearly 75 million unique prescriptions were written for Xanax and Ativan, two anti-anxiety medications, in the United States, indicating our country has a serious problem with stress. Furthermore, one in 10 Americans now takes an antidepressant medication -- and among women in their 40s and 50s, that number is one in four. From, what I see da...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In this study, about 5% of patients given any dosage of Vyvanse had to discontinue its use because of adverse effects.  3/196 patients initially randomized to Vyvanse had serious adverse effects, and one patient died, apparently of an amphetamine overdose.  Oddly, the article declared that the one death, due to methamphetamine overdose, was thought by a study investigator not to be related to treatment with another amphetamine, lisdexamfetamine.  That makes little sense, given that in a randomized controlled trial, the presumption is that differences in groups given different treatments were caused by these ...
Source: Health Care Renewal - Category: Health Management Tags: clinical trials conflicts of interest deception evidence-based medicine FDA marketing Shire stealth marketing Source Type: blogs
00:00 to 02.26—Dr. Bihari gives his background and credentials. Dr. Bihari: My medical training started at Harvard Medical School. I graduated in 1957. Then I trained in Internal Medicine at one of the Harvard teaching hospitals in Boston, Beth Israel, and then in Neurology at Massachusetts General in Boston. Then I went to the National Institutes of Health for two years doing brain physiology—brain research. I did another residency training in Psychiatry in New York, at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center and then, over the following five or six years, I got very involved in working in Drug Addiction. By 197...
Source: HONEST MEDICINE: My Dream for the Future - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Anecdotal Treatments HONEST MEDICINE Integrative Medicine Low Dose Naltrexone Obituaries Source Type: blogs
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