Mesothelioma Clinical Trials Involve Gene Therapy

Treatment options for malignant mesothelioma may soon include customized gene therapy, according to thoracic surgeon and scientist Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Gene therapy involves a laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s own T cells, which are a type of white blood cell, to recognize and destroy the cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the first gene therapy specifically for pediatric leukemia, signaling the start of a new approach to cancer treatment in this country. The newly approved treatment is also known as chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, which includes removing T cells from a patient, arming them with a protein linked to a particular cancer and then returning those cells to the patient. CAR T cell therapy already has shown considerable promise with blood cancers such as leukemia, which prompted the FDA’s groundbreaking approval. But its effectiveness with solid tumors, such as mesothelioma, has been limited until recently. Memorial Sloan Kettering Leading the Way Memorial Sloan Kettering has been a worldwide leader in developing CAR T cell therapy for cancer, making it safer and more effective. Adusumilli, who specializes in thoracic cancers, is the chief investigator of a promising clinical trial involving T cells genetically engineered to target mesothelin, a protein found in almost 90 percent of pleural mesothelioma tumors. Early trial results are encourag...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: CAR T cell therapy checkpoint blockade chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy Dr. Andy Haas Dr. Prasad Adusumilli Dr. Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner gene therapy cancer gene therapy for mesothelioma immunotherapy clinical trial mali Source Type: news

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A 73-year-old female presenting with haemoptysis and dyspnoea was found to have a locally advanced left thyroid mass and vocal cord palsy. A CT scan of the neck and thorax and endoscopy demonstrated invasion into the tracheal lumen. Histopathology of the intraluminal tracheal mass confirmed a papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The tumour was deemed unresectable due to local extent and patient comorbidities. TKI therapy with lenvatinib was used for 14 months. On serial scanning, a marked reduction in tumour volume from 31 × 59 × 32 mm to 17 × 28 × 22 mm was noted. This subsequently allowed a successful ...
Source: European Thyroid Journal - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 January 2019Source: Molecular and Cellular EndocrinologyAuthor(s): Irida Kastrati, Svetlana Semina, Benjamin Gordon, Emily SmartAbstractEstrogen receptor (ER) is the most important factor in the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Consequently, modulation of ER activity has been exploited to develop drugs against ER + breast cancer, such as tamoxifen, referred to as endocrine therapies. With deeper understanding of ER mechanism of action, posttranslational modifications (PTMs) are increasingly recognized as important in mediating ER activity. Some ER PTMs such as phosphorylatio...
Source: Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical AnalysisAuthor(s): Heebin Son, Keumhan Noh, Changhyun Kang, MinKyun Na, Sangtaek Oh, Im-Sook Song, Wonku KangAbstractIlimaquinone, a metabolite isolated from the marine sponge Hippiospongia metachromia, has antimicrobial, cytotoxic, anti-HIV, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activities. A new quantitative analytical method for determination of ilimaquinone in rat plasma using HPLC-MS/MS was developed and validated. Ascorbic acid was added to ensure the stability of ilimaquinone in plasma. After protein precipitation using a...
Source: Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 17 January 2019Source: PhytomedicineAuthor(s): Wagner B.R. Santos, Marlange A.O. Melo, Rafael S. Alves, Renan G. de Brito, Thallita K. Rabelo, Lindaura da S. Prado, Virginia K. dos S. Silva, Daniel P. Bezerra, José E.R. de Menezes-Filho, Diego S. Souza, Carla M.L. de Vasconcelos, Luciana Scotti, Marcus Tullius Scotti, Waldecy de Lucca Júnior, Lucindo J. Quintans-Júnior, Adriana G. GuimarãesAbstractBackgroundOncological pain is one of the most prevalent and difficult-to-treat symptoms in patients with cancer. p-cymene (PC) is a monoterpene found in more than 100...
Source: Phytomedicine - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
ConclusionThis is the first report on the antiproliferative activity of flavipin isolated from endophytic C. globosum and also proposed that interaction of flavipin with NFкB could be a possible mechanism for this activity. Flavipin induced apoptosis at low concentrations in cancer cell lines (A549, HT-29) and exhibited itself as a potential anticancer agent.Graphical abstract
Source: Phytomedicine - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
Americans are obsessed with protein. It’s touted as the cornerstone of any healthy diet, since it helps people feel full and builds muscle. But most Americans eat too much protein every day, according to federal estimates—and they’re going especially overboard with animal proteins, namely red meat. It’s becoming clear how big a problem excessive red-meat consumption can be for health. Research has found associations between diets heavy in red and processed meats and many chronic diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Red meat comes with high amounts of saturated fat, and proc...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news
ConclusionRadiation oncologists who were recently trained and had high treatment volume are associated with poorer outcomes among HNC patients getting IMRT treatment.
Source: Practical Radiation Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 16 January 2019Source: Journal of Geriatric OncologyAuthor(s): Nicolò Matteo Luca Battisti, Allison Magnuson, Mina S. Sedrak, Enrique Soto-Perez-de-Celis
Source: Journal of Geriatric Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Thoracic surgeon and scientist Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) Cancer Center believes customized gene therapy will soon change the way pleural mesothelioma is treated. Adusumilli, director of the Mesothelioma Program at MSK, has worked for a decade on developing tumor immunology for thoracic malignancies. He is currently the principal investigator of a phase I clinical trial involving specially prepared immune cells — chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells — that have shown impressive efficacy with mesothelioma. “I think this is going to change the paradigm of treating mesotheliom...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Source Type: news
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Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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