Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

A Fire at a School in Kuala Lumpur Has Killed 24 People

(KUALA LUMPUR) — A fire that blocked the only exit to an Islamic school dormitory killed 24 people who were trapped behind barred windows, mostly teenagers, on the outskirts of Malaysia’s capital early Thursday, officials said. A government official said a wall separating the victims from a second exit “shouldn’t have been there.” Firefighters and witnesses described scenes of horror — first of boys screaming for help as neighbors watched helplessly, and later of burned bodies huddled in a corner of the room. School employee Arif Mawardy said he woke up to what he thought was a thunderstorm, only to realize it was the sound of people screaming. Firefighters rushed to the scene after receiving a distress call at 5:41 a.m. and took an hour to put out the blaze, which started on the top floor of the three-story building, Kuala Lumpur police chief Amar Singh said. He said there were at least 24 charred bodies, 22 of them boys between 13 and 17, and two teachers. “We believe (they died of) suffocation … the bodies were totally burnt,” he said. Singh said 14 other students and four teachers were rescued, with six of them hospitalized in critical condition. The fire broke out near the only door to the boys’ dormitory, trapping the victims since the windows were barred, fire department senior official Abu Obaidat Mohamad Saithalimat said. He said the cause was believed to be an electrical short-circuit, though Singh said t...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized fire Malaysia onetime Source Type: news

Related Links:

Patients often can't help but wonder what doctors and nurses are doing while they're sedated. Some suspect trash talking. Others are wary of racially-charged comments. On Wednesday, a British surgeon gave patients something new to worry about: Getting their doctors' initials burned into their organs while they are unconscious. Simon Bramhall, 53, pleaded guilty to two counts of assault […]Related:A baby was born with her heart outside her body — and survived‘Phenomenal’ trial results may lead to a treatment for Huntington’s disease, experts sayTrump reportedly drinks 12 ca...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Authors: Mathur P, Jha S, Ramteke S, Jain NK Abstract Silver nanoparticles are particles in the size ranging between 1 and 100 nm. The two major methods used for synthesis of silver nanoparticle are the physical and chemical methods with the disadvantage that they are expensive and can also have toxicity. Biological method is being used as an expedient alternative, as this approach is environment-friendly and less toxic and it includes plant extracts, microorganism, fungi, etc. The major applications of silver nanoparticles in the medical field include diagnostic applications and therapeutic applications, ap...
Source: Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology - Category: Biotechnology Tags: Artif Cells Nanomed Biotechnol Source Type: research
BACKGROUND: Pre-drinking is often defined as an economically-minded set of drinking practices engaged in prior to attending public entertainment areas, such as licensed venues. This paper explores motivations and practical considerations that a sample of t...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
NEW YORK (AP) — The crude pipe bomb that exploded beneath the streets of New York this week served as a chilling reminder of the vulnerability of the city's subway system, a 24-hour-a-day operation with 472 stations and more than 5 million daily riders. While police say the nation's largest subway system has some of the tightest security possible that still allows busy New Yorkers to get where they're going, they acknowledge they can't be everywhere or anticipate every kind of attack, particularly in this era of lone-wolf terrorism. "It's very difficult, and it's getting harder," John Miller, the New York P...
Source: JEMS Operations - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: News Operations Source Type: news
Make sure Star Wars isn ’t the only celestial event you see tonight. The bright Geminid meteor shower reaches its peak in the early hours of Thursday morningThe latest chapter of events in a galaxy far, far away isn ’t the only thing worth staying up late for tonight in the UK. Just as cinema goers are pouring out of the midnightStar Wars showing, up in the (hopefully clear) skies above, the Geminid meteor shower will be reaching its climax in a solar system very, very close to us – our own, in fact.Meteors burn up between 80 and 120km above our heads. This particular annual meteor shower has been getting...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science Meteors Astronomy Space Source Type: news
Why is chosing a diet so hard? The information we receive about diets, food, and nutrition is confusing.  Millions of dollars are spent on weight loss schemes that never last.  So, how do you choose a diet that will work?  This post is the first in a series of articles exploring questions to ask when choosing a diet.  Here goes… Does the grapefruit diet work? It’s not the grapefruit’s fault.  This morning, however, I had three emails touting a celebrity with a “new” grapefruit diet to get in shape for the holidays.  This sort of thing drives me crazy.  Firs...
Source: Embrace Your Heart Wellness Initiative - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Award Winning Blog Heart Health grapefruit healthy diet nutrition Source Type: blogs
According to published reports, over 50 percent of doctors are burned out. The reason? They are overwhelmed by payment and quality rules as well as poor information technology. It’s no secret that physicians spend long hours seeing patients. But as financial pressures have mounted within hospitals, doctors are forced to perform more administrative tasks. In fact, administrative tasks account for nearly a quarter of the average doctor’s schedule. That’s all time diverted away from patient care. Many physicians feel a loss of autonomy — a major factor in burnout. The National Academy of Science now se...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Tech Primary Care Psychiatry Source Type: blogs
Make sure Star Wars isn ’t the only celestial event you see tonight. The bright Geminid meteor shower reaches its peak in the early hours of Thursday morningThe latest chapter of events in a galaxy far, far away isn ’t the only thing worth staying up late for tonight in the UK. Just as cinema goers are pouring out of the midnightStar Wars showing, up in the (hopefully clear) skies above, the Geminid meteor shower will be reaching its climax in a solar system very, very close to us – our own, in fact.Meteors burn up between 80 and 120km above our heads. This particular annual meteor shower has been getting...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Science Meteors Astronomy Space Source Type: news
The London-based Committee of Toxicology reports that despite smokeless tobacco exposing users to up to 90 percent fewer chemicals than cigarettes, their safety information is unclear.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This study aimed to provide a greater understanding of the systemic factors involved in coal mine accidents and to examine the relationships between the contributing factors across all levels of the system. Ninety-four extraordinarily major coal mine accid...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news
More News: Boys | Burns | Children | Government | Health | Malaysia Health | Science | Students | Study | Teachers | Universities & Medical Training