A Novel Dynamic Model Describing the Spread of the MERS-CoV and the Expression of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4.

A Novel Dynamic Model Describing the Spread of the MERS-CoV and the Expression of Dipeptidyl Peptidase 4. Comput Math Methods Med. 2017;2017:5285810 Authors: Tang S, Ma W, Bai P Abstract The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, a newly identified pathogen, causes severe pneumonia in humans. MERS is caused by a coronavirus known as MERS-CoV, which attacks the respiratory system. The recently defined receptor for MERS-CoV, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4), is generally expressed in endothelial and epithelial cells and has been shown to be present on cultured human nonciliated bronchiolar epithelium cells. In this paper, a class of novel four-dimensional dynamic model describing the infection of MERS-CoV is given, and then global stability of the equilibria of the model is discussed. Our results show that the spread of MERS-CoV can also be controlled by decreasing the expression rate of DPP4. PMID: 28894474 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Computational and Mathematical Methods in Medicine - Category: Statistics Tags: Comput Math Methods Med Source Type: research

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Abstract This nationwide, prospective cohort study evaluated pulmonary function and radiological sequelae according to infection severity in 73 survivors from the 2015 Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea. Patients with severe pneumonia in MERS-coronavirus infection had more impaired pulmonary function than those with no or mild pneumonia at the 1-year follow-up, which was compatible with the radiological sequelae. Severe pneumonia significantly impairs pulmonary function and makes long radiological sequelae in MERS. PMID: 29892209 [PubMed - in process]
Source: J Korean Med Sci - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: J Korean Med Sci Source Type: research
Conclusions This hospital outbreak demonstrated the difficulties in diagnosing pneumonia in patients with renal and cardiac failure, which leads to delayed suspicion of MERS-CoV and hence delay in applying the proper infection control procedures. In MERS-CoV endemic countries there is an urgent need for developing rapid point-of-care testing that would assist emergency department staff in triaging suspected cases of MERS-CoV to ensure timely isolation and management of their primary illness and prevent major MERS-CoV outbreaks.
Source: American Journal of Infection Control - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Rapidly and accurately identifying individuals who are at high risk for Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS ‐CoV) remains a major challenge for the medical and scientific communities. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a risk prediction model for the screening of suspected cases of MERS-CoV infection in patients who had developed pneumonia.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
The rapid and accurate identification of individuals who are at high risk of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection remains a major challenge for the medical and scientific communities. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a risk prediction model for the screening of suspected cases of MERS-CoV infection in patients who have developed pneumonia.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: As for MERS Co-V infections, underlying comorbidities impacted the clinical outcomes of OC43 infections. PMID: 29402475 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Medecine et Maladies Infectieuses - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Med Mal Infect Source Type: research
ABSTRACT Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) have been considered to be relatively harmless respiratory pathogens in the past. However, after the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and emergence of the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), HCoVs have received worldwide attention as important pathogens in respiratory tract infection. This review focuses on the epidemiology, pathogenesis and clinical characteristics among SARS‐coronaviruses (CoV), MERS‐CoV and other HCoV infections.
Source: Respirology - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Invited Review Series: Respiratory Infections in The Asia ‐Pacific Region Source Type: research
Since the initial description of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), we adopted a systematic process of screening admitted patients with community acquired pneumonia. Here, we report the result of the surveillance activity in a general hospital in Saudi Arabia over a four year period.
Source: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionThe results highlight the pulmonary and extra‐pulmonary pathological changes of MERS‐CoV infection and provide the first evidence of the viral presence in human renal tissue, which suggests tissue tropism for MERS‐CoV in kidney.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Histopathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
Abstract Thailand reported the first Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) case on 18 June 2015 (day 4) in an Omani patient with heart condition who was diagnosed with pneumonia on hospital admission on 15 June 2015 (day 1). Two false negative RT-PCR on upper respiratory tract samples on days 2 and 3 led to a 48-hour diagnosis delay and a decision to transfer the patient out of the negative pressure unit (NPU). Subsequent examination of sputum later on day 3 confirmed MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. The patient was immediately moved back into the NPU and then transferred to Bamrasnaradura Infectious Disea...
Source: Euro Surveill - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Euro Surveill Source Type: research
Thailand reported the first Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) case on 18 June 2015 (day 4) in an Omani patient with heart condition who was diagnosed with pneumonia on hospital admission on 15 June 2015 (day 1). Two false negative RT-PCR on upper respiratory tract samples on days 2 and 3 led to a 48-hour diagnosis delay and a decision to transfer the patient out of the negative pressure unit (NPU). Subsequent examination of sputum later on day 3 confirmed MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection. The patient was immediately moved back into the NPU and then transferred to Bamrasnaradura Infectious Disease Institute. Over...
Source: Eurosurveillance - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
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