Audiometric Testing With Pulsed, Steady, and Warble Tones in Listeners With Tinnitus and Hearing Loss.

Conclusions: Pulsed tones provide advantages over steady and warble tones for patients regardless of hearing or tinnitus status. Although listeners preferred pulsed and warble tones to steady tones, pulsed tones are not susceptible to the effects of off-frequency listening, a consideration when testing listeners with sloping audiograms. PMID: 28892822 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: American Journal of Audiology - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Am J Audiol Source Type: research

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AbstractAs research on the cognitive impact of medical conditions and mental health disorders advances, it is imperative for forensic neuropsychologists to stay abreast of rapidly accumulating new empirical evidence from neuroscience and neuropsychology to disentangle multiple determinants of cognitive impairment. Although medicolegal neuropsychological assessments traditionally focused on traumatic brain injury (TBI) sequelae, it is equally important to consider the potential impact of any other acquired, or secondarily induced brain impairments, regardless of their source. Such injuries or conditions are at times assumed...
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Source: Audiology and Neurotology - Category: Audiology Source Type: research
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Source: Advances in Therapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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Source: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
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Source: Seminars in Hearing - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
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Source: Seminars in Hearing - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Review Article Source Type: research
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