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Even `metabolically healthy ’ obese people have higher heart disease risk

(Reuters Health) - People who are considered metabolically healthy may still have a higher risk of developing heart problems if they are obese than they would if they weighed less, a recent study suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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This study cohort is a healthy subset of the EpiPath cohort, excluding all participants with acute or chronic diseases. With a mediation analysis we examined whether CMV titers may account for immunosenescence observed in ELA. In this study, we have shown that ELA is associated with higher levels of T cell senescence in healthy participants. Not only did we find a higher number of senescent cells (CD57+), these cells also expressed higher levels of CD57, a cell surface marker for senescence, and were more cytotoxic in ELA compared to controls. Control participants with high CMV titers showed a higher number of senes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) It looks like the weight loss tip to eat slowly has its merits. According to a recent study, eating too fast increases the “risk of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.” Research findings indicate that individuals who eat fast might end up eating more because their bodies don’t have the time to realize that...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions Metabolic syndrome is independently associated with impaired GLS. Among the MS criteria, central obesity best depicted the link between metabolic derangement and cardiac function.
Source: Revista Espanola de Cardiologia - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Faced with rising health care costs and a growing number of employees with lifestyle-related conditions such as type two diabetes and heart disease, employers can no longer afford to sit on the sidelines for workforce health and must negotiate better rates with insurance carriers and invest in prevention. This is especially true for Texas employers as obesity and resulting chronic conditions are estimated to cost businesses statewide an extra $32 billion by 2030 in health care, lost productivity,…
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Source Type: news
Researchers have found a noteworthy effect on longevity in a small study population that includes the only known individuals with a loss of function mutation in plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Individuals with the mutation live seven years longer on average than near relatives without it. Repeating the study with larger groups of people obviously isn't a practical option in the case of rare mutations - we're stuck with the family trees that the research community is fortunate enough to identify - but one nonetheless has to wish for more individuals, in order to obtain a more reliable confirmation, when an effect...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs
This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29143336 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Physiology - Category: Physiology Authors: Tags: J Physiol Source Type: research
Conclusions: Health education in the digital era needs to be accurate, evidence-based, and regulated. As technologies continue to evolve, we must be equipped to face the challenges it brings with it.
Source: Journal of Medical Internet Research - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
AbstractAdults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are a rapidly increasing population and their impact on healthcare resources is not fully understood. The purpose of this study was to describe the costs of hospitalizations for non-cardiac disease for adults with CHD. We conducted a retrospective review of hospital discharge data from the University HealthSystem Consortium Clinical Data Base/Resource Manager from January 2011 through December 2013. Patients were  ≥ 18 years old at admission with any ICD-9 code for moderate or high severity CHD; cardiac surgical admissions were excluded. The comparison gr...
Source: Mammalian Genome - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
Japan-based researchers find that eating too fast may lead to metabolic syndrome, which is a cluster of risk factors for severe cardiometabolic conditions.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 13 November 2017 Source:The Lancet Author(s): Peter S Azzopardi, Susan M Sawyer, John B Carlin, Louisa Degenhardt, Ngiare Brown, Alex D Brown, George C Patton Background Indigenous populations have high rates of disease and premature mortality. Most Indigenous communities are young, and adolescence (age 10–24 years) provides great opportunities for population health gain. However, the absence of a comprehensive account of Indigenous adolescents' health has been a barrier to effective policy. We aimed to report a national health profile for Indigenous adolescents in Australia. Metho...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
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