Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Personal Health: Alternatives to Drugs for Treating Pain

Specialists are exploring nondrug, noninvasive treatments, some of which have proved highly effective.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Pain Therapy and Rehabilitation Back (Human Body Part) Acupuncture Yoga Physical Therapy Source Type: news

Related Links:

Authors: Zhang B, Xu H, Wang J, Liu B, Sun G Abstract Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (LIDH), as the main contributor to low back pain and sciatica, imposes a heavy burden on both the individual and society. Non-operative treatment or conservative treatment has proven effective in alleviation of the symptoms of LIDH and are considered to be a first-line choice for most cases. Active lifestyle, physical therapy, complementary and alternative medicine therapy or Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) therapy, and pharmacotherapy are routinely used as effective non-operative treatment for LIDH patients. However, how...
Source: BioScience Trends - Category: Biomedical Science Tags: Biosci Trends Source Type: research
Despite being a less common cause of low back pain, sciatica is still something I regularly see as a general internist. Primary care doctors can and should manage sciatica, because for most individuals the body can fix the problem. My job is to help manage the pain while the body does its job. When a person’s symptoms don’t improve, I discuss the role of surgery or an injection to speed things up. What is sciatica? Sciatica refers to pain caused by the sciatic nerve that carries messages from the brain down the spinal cord to the legs. The pain of sciatica typically radiates down one side from the lower back in...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a question that has challenged generations of patients and their doctors. The answer has changed over the years. When I was in medical school in the early 1980s, bedrest for a week or more was often recommended for severe back pain. This sometimes included hospital admission. Then, research demonstrated that prolonged bedrest was actually a bad idea. It was no better (and often worse) than taking it easy for a day or two followed by slowly increasing activity, including stretching and strengthening the back. Medications, including pain relievers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Complementary and alternative medicine Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
4 hours ago ... Increasingly, more people are using alternative methods, such as massage, physical therapy and acupuncture in the treatment of chronic back  ...
Source: AARP.org News - Category: American Health Source Type: news
Acupuncture is a treatment that dates back to around 100 BC in China. It is based on traditional Chinese concepts such as qi (pronounced “chee” and considered life force energy) and meridians (paths through which qi flows). Multiple studies have failed to demonstrate any scientific evidence supporting such principles. Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin needles into the skin at multiple, varying locations based on the patient’s symptoms. Once inserted, some acupuncturists hand turn the needles for added therapeutic benefit. Although there are many uses for acupuncture in traditional Chinese medicin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Those of you who have experienced pain, especially gnawing, chronic pain, know that it affects your happiness, outlook and ability to function.In the past couple of years, the treatment of chronic pain has undergone an earthshaking transformation as opioid addiction continues to claim — and ruin — lives.Many primary care doctors no longer liberally prescribe opioid painkillers such as oxycodone, fentanyl and hydrocodone for back pain, migraines and other chronic conditions. Instead, they are increasingly turning to alternative medications and non-drug options such as acupuncture and physical therapy."Most ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
Back when I was 30, my life fell apart. My marriage collapsed, I sank into a depression, and I lost my home, money, and self-respect. I also blew out my knee. I wish I could say I injured it climbing Mount Kilimanjaro or something, but no—it was nothing that exciting. Here’s what happened: One afternoon, right in the middle of my God-awful divorce, I turned my head to look at something over my right shoulder, and suddenly my left knee...exploded. It made a sound like a gunshot, and I felt something inside the joint go snap. Then my leg went out from under me, and I hit the ground in agony. When I finally stood ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
This reporting is brought to you by HuffPost’s health and science platform, The Scope. Like us on Facebook and Twitter and tell us your story: scopestories@huffingtonpost.com.   Sarah DiGiulio is The Huffington Post’s sleep reporter. You can contact her at sarah.digiulio@huffingtonpost.com.  -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: With additional training, physiotherapists can deliver effective CB interventions. However, without training or resources, successful translation and implementation remains unlikely. Researchers should improve reporting of procedural information, provide relevant materials, and offer accessible provider training. Implications for Rehabilitation Previous reviews have established that traditional biomedical-based treatments (e.g., acupuncture, manual therapy, massage, and specific exercise programmes) that focus only on physical symptoms do provide short-term benefits but the sustained effect is questionable. A ...
Source: Disability and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Disabil Rehabil Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling The 2016 summer Olympics had its share of exciting performances, upsets, and photo finishes. But for days after Michael Phelps’s first appearance at the games, it seemed all anyone could talk about was “cupping.” It’s an ancient therapy that left multiple circular discolorations on his skin. During “dry cupping,” suction is applied to the skin for several minutes; sometimes it is combined with massage, acupuncture, or other alternative therapies. (“Wet cupping” is similar except that blood is removed by making small cuts in the skin.) Cuppin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Source Type: blogs
More News: Acupuncture | Back Pain | Health | Pain | Physical Therapy | Rehabilitation