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Sudden cardiac arrest while eating a hot dog: a rare presentation of Brugada syndrome in a child - Ozyilmaz I, Akyol B, Ergul Y.

Patients who are diagnosed with Brugada syndrome (BS) usually experience sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and arrhythmia when they have a high fever, consume alcohol, and, more frequently, during their night sleep. In some rare cases, an SCA can be seen dependi...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Long-term exposure to NO2 and road traffic noise was associated with higher risk of heart failure, mainly among men, in both single- and two-pollutant models. High exposure to both pollutants was associated with highest risk. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1272 Received: 25 October 2016 Revised: 09 August 2017 Accepted: 09 August 2017 Published: 26 September 2017 Address correspondence to M. Sørensen. Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. Telephone: +45 35257626. Email: mettes@cancer.dk Supplemental Material is available online (https://doi...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
Publication date: July 2017 Source:Canadian Journal of Cardiology, Volume 33, Issue 7 Author(s): Kiran Sidhu, Anthony Tang Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia affecting a growing number of Canadians. Traditional risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and valvular disease, are often present in older patients with AF. Modifiable risk factors should also be sought in patients presenting with new-onset AF. Obesity is a rapidly growing epidemic in Canada. Emerging evidence is linking obesity and the often coexistent obstructive sleep apnea with an increased incidence of AF. Alcohol intake can also predispose...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 April 2017 Source:Canadian Journal of Cardiology Author(s): Kiran Sidhu, Anthony Tang Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common arrhythmia affecting a growing number of Canadians. Traditional risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes and valvular disease are often present in older patients with AF. Modifiable risk factors should also be sought in patients presenting with new onset AF. Obesity is a rapidly growing epidemic in our country. Emerging evidence is linking obesity and the often coexistent obstructive sleep apnea with an increased incidence of AF. Alcohol intake can also predisp...
Source: Canadian Journal of Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
I truly hope that very soon I do not have to make an appointment at the GP when I suspect signs of a disease, but my GP will send me a message that she spotted something irregular in my latest test results and my digital health data, so I’d better visit. Let me show you in detail, how primary care should be carried out in the future! Digital health should become organic part of primary care in the future I live a fairly healthy life. I use data to improve my lifestyle and to make better decisions through optimizing my sleep pattern, my physical, my cognitive or my emotional abilities; and I had several genetic t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers digital health Education gc3 GP health trackers Healthcare Innovation primary care technology wearables Source Type: blogs
in JL Abstract Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is characterized by recurrent partial or complete pharyngeal collapses during sleep. The pathophysiology of OSAS is complex and multifactorial. Factors influencing upper airway patency include a reduction in upper airway dimensions that can result from both anatomical and functional alterations (obesity, fluid shift or maxillo-facial structural changes), and increased pharyngeal collapsibility owing to reduced neuromuscular compensation and lack of the pharyngeal protective reflex during sleep. Severe OSAS is associated with a high cardiometabolic risk. Obstr...
Source: Presse Medicale - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Presse Med Source Type: research
ConclusionsOccupational distress reduces career satisfaction, affects patient care and increases the chances of oncologists switching to another area of medicine therefore future research should explore appropriate interventions.
Source: Psycho-Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: REVIEW Source Type: research
e A Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia encountered by cardiologists and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Risk factors for AF include age, male sex, genetic predisposition, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, obesity, excessive alcohol, smoking, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary disease, air pollution, heart failure, and possibly excessive exercise. The management of AF involves decisions about rate versus rhythm control. Asymptomatic patients are generally managed with rate control and anticoagulation. Symptomatic patients will desire rhythm control. Rhythm control optio...
Source: Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circulation Source Type: research
Summer’s in full swing, and the hot, sweltering days might make some people more prone to fainting. Fainting, also known by the medical term syncope, is a momentary loss of consciousness caused by lack of blood flow to the brain. It can strike anyone, and it’s fairly common. Researchers estimate that anywhere between 15 and 39 percent of people will experience fainting at least once in their life, but people who take certain medications may be more prone to feeling dizzy, weak and eventually passing out. Still others may be more prone to fainting for genetic reasons.  Syncope can be caused by a wide variet...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of death and disability among older adults. Modifiable vascular risk factors for AD (VRF) include obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, and metabolic syndrome. Here, interactions between cerebrovascular function and development of AD are reviewed, as are interventions to improve cerebral blood flow and reduce VRF. Atherosclerosis and small vessel cerebral disease impair metabolic regulation of cerebral blood flow and, along with microvascular rarefaction and altered trans-capillary exchange, create conditions favoring AD development. Although currently the...
Source: Experimental Biology and Medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Physiology Source Type: research
I do AF ablation. But, similar to my 2015 update, I continue to do fewer of these procedures. What is new in 2016 is more confidence that this is the right approach. My technique for ablating AF has not changed. I do pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) with point-to-point RF. Each burn takes 10-30 seconds, and at the end, the machine counts about 60-80 burns. If the patient has had atrial flutter, or previous heart surgery, or if I can induce atrial flutter, I will do a CTI ablation for flutter in the right atrium during the 45-min period of waiting to see if the veins reconnect. (CTI = cavotriscupid isthmus). I then check for ...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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