Emotional recognition of dynamic facial expressions before and after cochlear implantation in adults with progressive deafness.

Emotional recognition of dynamic facial expressions before and after cochlear implantation in adults with progressive deafness. Hear Res. 2017 Aug 31;354:64-72 Authors: Ambert-Dahan E, Giraud AL, Mecheri H, Sterkers O, Mosnier I, Samson S Abstract Visual processing has been extensively explored in deaf subjects in the context of verbal communication, through the assessment of speech reading and sign language abilities. However, little is known about visual emotional processing in adult progressive deafness, and after cochlear implantation. The goal of our study was thus to assess the influence of acquired post-lingual progressive deafness on the recognition of dynamic facial emotions that were selected to express canonical fear, happiness, sadness, and anger. A total of 23 adults with post-lingual deafness separated into two groups; those assessed either before (n = 10) and those assessed after (n = 13) cochlear implantation (CI); and 13 normal hearing (NH) individuals participated in the current study. Participants were asked to rate the expression of the four cardinal emotions, and to evaluate both their emotional valence (unpleasant-pleasant) and arousal potential (relaxing-stimulating). We found that patients with deafness were impaired in the recognition of sad faces, and that patients equipped with a CI were additionally impaired in the recognition of happiness and fear (but not anger). Relative to controls, all patients with de...
Source: Hearing Research - Category: Audiology Authors: Tags: Hear Res Source Type: research

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(University of Copenhagen) New study from the University of Copenhagen reports that political discussions about genetically modified foods have ignored concerns among Danes that GM foods are 'unnatural'. This is very regrettable, according to Jesper Lassen, a researcher who has investigated public attitudes about genetic modification for the past 25 years.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news
In a recent paper, Matsushima et al. reported about a 2 years and 6 months-old male who developed non-syndromic, progressive impaired hearing by the age of 9 months [1]. The family history was positive for hypoacusis in the father, mother, one maternal and paternal uncle each, maternal grandmother and grandfather, maternal grand uncle, and maternal great-grandmother [1]. Hearing impairment in the index case was attributed to the variant m.7445A>G variant outside the tRNA (Ser) gene [1]. The index case had also inherited the variant c.235delC in the GJB2 gene from his father [1].
Source: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We would like to thank Dr. Josef Finsterer and Dr. Zarrouk-Mahjoub for their insightful and constructive comments on our study [1]. At first, m.7445A>G heteroplasmy rates reported by Tranah et al. was based on the analysis on platelets [2] and our study was based on the analysis on whole blood cells. Thus, the heteroplasmy rates of the two studies cannot be compared because heteroplasmy rates are various in various organs in cases with mitochondrial diseases [3,4].
Source: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
This article presents the various aspects of HIV/AIDS care for deaf people in Burundi to assess social inequalities in health especially the access to preventive care. Our work is particularly focused on identifying the factors that hinder the access of deaf people to HIV/AIDS care in developing countries such as Burundi. The study is based on a literature review and a qualitative study with stakeholders and beneficiaries. The literature review was conducted on reports or other official documents that were made by various stakeholders involved in the fight against HIV/AIDS. A qualitative approach was made of interviews wit...
Source: ALTER - European Journal of Disability Research - Category: Disability Source Type: research
Abstract Very little is known about people's ability to localize sound under varying workload conditions, though it would be expected that increasing workload should degrade performance. A set of eight auditory clinical alarms already known to have relatively high localizability (the ease with which their location is identified) when tested alone were tested in six conditions where workload was varied. Participants were required to indicate the location of a series of alarms emanating at random from one of eight speaker locations. Additionally, they were asked to read, carry out mental arithmetic tasks, be exposed...
Source: Applied Ergonomics - Category: Occupational Health Authors: Tags: Appl Ergon Source Type: research
Consanguinity rate is high in Algeria, and the population is thus at high risk for genetic diseases transmitted on an autosomal recessive mode. Inherited congenital hearing impairment (HI) is a highly heterogeneous disorder, which affects approximately 1 in 800 Algerian newborns. Several hundreds of genes responsible for deafness have been reported among which more than one hundred are responsible for isolated deafness, of which 19 have already been reported to be involved in the Algerian population.
Source: International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusions: We present the largest series of patients with scala vestibuli cochlear implantation. This approach provides at least comparable auditory performances without having any deleterious effects on programming parameters. This viable and useful insertion route might be the primary surgical alternative when facing partial cochlear ossification.
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: Cochlear Implants Source Type: research
Conclusion: We obtained a fairly good impression of what a CI can sound like for SSD patients. This may help to better inform and educate patients and family members about the sound of a CI.
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: Cochlear Implants Source Type: research
Conclusions: Postoperative performance of adult, prelingually deaf cochlear implant candidates, with long-term deafness is dependent on their preoperative speech perception and residual hearing. Candidates who have negligible residual hearing are expected to have no or only limited postoperative benefit of their implants and are at risk of becoming nonusers.
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: Cochlear Implants Source Type: research
Conclusions: A definite genetic cause was found in 25 (50%) of congenital, bilaterally deaf children. Our data show that implementation of a gene panel improves the diagnostic yield for etiological work-up of congenital profound HL to 86%. Identification of the etiology of congenital HL may contribute to predicting outcomes of cochlear implantation.
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: Pediatric Otology Source Type: research
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