Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Tweet and Learn: Twitter as an Educational Tool

Twitter has been growing in popularity (although not as a money-making venture), and is one of the most used social media tools. While many still use it to connect with friends, follow the antics of celebrities, and keep up with family members, the use of Twitter as an educational tool has also been emerging for several years, especially in the health sciences. Teaching about the tools and skills to use social media to its full advantage is a perfect role for librarians. We can advocate for the inclusion of these skills in the curriculum, teaching students to use social media professionally and also how to avoid pitfalls and address privacy concerns.1, 2 For students in the healthcare professions, using Twitter can teach them to connect to colleagues, to share research, to keep up with developments in their field, to learn of publishing opportunities, and to collaborate. It can be used as a current awareness tool and to “virtually” attend conferences if they can’t be there in person, via the use of hashtags.  Journal and book clubs are also popular on Twitter and can be found in various specialties. Articles or books are chosen in advance and a discussion takes place online at a scheduled time. A recent article analyzed a Twitter journal club for medical radiation professionals and concluded that, “Twitter journal club can provide an authentic learning environment with all the cognitive dimensions afforded in a formal classroom or face-to-face jou...
Source: Dragonfly - Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Tags: Training & Education Source Type: news

Related Links:

CONCLUSION: Dutch incidence and cost estimates based on claims were consistent with previous estimates. Prevalence estimates were somewhat higher. Drug and hospital costs were highest shortly after the diagnosis. Healthcare consumption related to comorbidities was in-line with the previously reported comorbidity estimates. PMID: 29775086 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Comp Eff Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: This study provides the Chinese-specific health utility data for advanced NSCLC using the EQ-5D. PMID: 29775084 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Comp Eff Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: EN was at least effective as ranitidine plus EN as SUP. PMID: 29775083 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Comp Eff Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Further discussions about the adequacy of COS for acute pediatric pain, as well as interventions to increase the uptake of COS may be warranted. PMID: 29775075 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research - Category: General Medicine Tags: J Comp Eff Res Source Type: research
Authors: Lee DK, In J Abstract Length of time is a variable often encountered during data analysis. Survival analysis provides simple, intuitive results concerning time-to-event for events of interest, which are not confined to death. This review introduces methods of analyzing time-to-event. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling method are described with examples of hypothetical data. PMID: 29768911 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Korean Journal of Anesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Korean J Anesthesiol Source Type: research
Conclusions: This tool can be used to generate analysis report and charts using the central database. This information is only provided after prior approval has been received from the patient for medical research purposes. PMID: 29770248 [PubMed]
Source: Healthcare Informatics Research - Category: Information Technology Tags: Healthc Inform Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: The evidences suggest that qSOFA is a better diagnostic criteria than SIRS. The low sensitivity of qSOFA can be improved by carefully selecting the threshold to translate the predicted probabilities into labels. These findings can guide healthcare providers in selecting risk-stratification measures for patients presenting to an ED with sepsis. PMID: 29770247 [PubMed]
Source: Healthcare Informatics Research - Category: Information Technology Tags: Healthc Inform Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: The DSM app was developed based on behavioral change theory through IMB models. It was designed to be evidence-based, user-centered, and effective. It remains necessary to fully evaluate the effect of the DSM app on the DSM behavior changes of diabetes patients. PMID: 29770246 [PubMed]
Source: Healthcare Informatics Research - Category: Information Technology Tags: Healthc Inform Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: Increased sensor durability and a higher percentage of analyzed steps indicates that IngVaL is an improvement over the prototype system. The combined strategy of amplitude and step frequency was confirmed as the most accurate method. PMID: 29770245 [PubMed]
Source: Healthcare Informatics Research - Category: Information Technology Tags: Healthc Inform Res Source Type: research
Conclusions: The adaptive neuro-fuzzy algorithm produces a more accurate model as it applies both the capabilities of a neural network architecture and experts' knowledge as a hybrid algorithm. It identifies nonlinear components, yielding remarkable results for prediction the length of stay, which is a useful calculation output to support ICU management, enabling higher quality of administration and cost reduction. PMID: 29770244 [PubMed]
Source: Healthcare Informatics Research - Category: Information Technology Tags: Healthc Inform Res Source Type: research
More News: Classrooms | Conferences | Databases & Libraries | Education | Environmental Health | Learning | Medical Ethics | Pathology | Science | Students | Teaching | Training | Universities & Medical Training