Association between high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels with abdominal aortic aneurysms: fact of fiction?

Association between high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels with abdominal aortic aneurysms: fact of fiction? Curr Med Res Opin. 2017 Sep 01;:1-2 Authors: Paraskevas KI, Torella F PMID: 28862487 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Medical Research and Opinion - Category: Research Tags: Curr Med Res Opin Source Type: research

Related Links:

Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) primarily affect men over 65 years old who often have many other diseases, with similar risk factors and pathobiological mechanisms to AAA. The aim of this study was to assess ...
Source: BMC Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
This study was performed to investigate miR-126a-5p's role in AAA formation. In vivo, a 28-d infusion of 1 μg/kg/min Angiotensin (Ang) II was used to induce AAA formation in Apoe-/- mice. MiR-126a-5p (20 mg/kg; MIMAT0000137) or negative control (NC) agomirs were intravenously injected to mice on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post-Ang II infusion. Our data showed that miR-126a-5p overexpression significantly improved the survival and reduced aortic dilatation in Ang II-infused mice. Elastic fragment and ECM degradation induced by Ang II were also ameliorated by miR-126a-5p. A strong up-regulation of ADAM metallopeptidas...
Source: J Cell Mol Med - Category: Molecular Biology Authors: Tags: J Cell Mol Med Source Type: research
(Temple University Health System) New research by scientists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University suggests that abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) can be prevented therapeutically. In work published online May 28 in the journal Cardiovascular Research, they show for the first time in animals that blocking a molecule known as dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) can stop AAA from developing.
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - Category: Biology Source Type: news
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Patients with a vascular condition called abdominal aortic aneurysm did not benefit from taking the common antibiotic doxycycline for two years to shrink the aneurysm when compared to those who took a placebo, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
This study investigates the outcomes of OSR and FEVAR for the treatment of cAAAs and examines the hospital volume-outcome relationship for these procedures.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Anatomical variations of the renal arteries may complicate endovascular repair of infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Occlusion of renal branches may be necessary to seal the aneurysm sac efficiently. Depending on the size of the affected renal arteries and the supplied parenchyma, this can lead to loss of renal function.Iliac branch devices (IBDs) have been created in order to preserve the internal iliac artery in aortoiliac or isolated iliac aneurysms; however, IBDs have the potential to maintain patency of other arteries as well.
Source: Annals of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Case Report Source Type: research
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) A new landmark study by researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) found that patients with a vascular condition, called abdominal aortic aneurysm, received no benefits from taking a common antibiotic drug to reduce inflammation.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
This randomized trial compares the effect of doxycycline with placebo on reducing CT-measured abdominal aortic aneurysms over 2 years among patients with small infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysms.
Source: JAMA - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
To identify candidates undergoing elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) of asymptomatic infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm who are eligible for early ( ≤6 hours) hospital discharge or to have EVAR performed in free-standing ambulatory surgery centers.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
Three out of four patients with infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are now treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR). The incidence of secondary procedures and surgical conversions is increasing for a population theoretically unfit for open surgery. The indications and outcomes of late open surgical conversions (LOC) after EVAR in a high volume tertiary vascular unit are reported.
Source: Journal of Vascular Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
More News: Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm | Aortic Aneurysm | Research