Prevalence and distribution of Borrelia and Babesia species in ticks feeding on dogs in the U.K.

In this study, ticks were collected from dogs by veterinarians participating in a U.K.‐wide tick surveillance programme. The ticks were subjected to polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis for detection of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l. and Babesia spp. pathogens, the distributions of which were mapped. DNA of B. burgdorferi s.l. and Babesia spp. was detected in 2.0% and 1.5% of the ticks analysed, respectively. The results map a widespread distribution of the two pathogens in the U.K.
Source: Medical and Veterinary Entomology - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

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Updated Date: Jul 16, 2019 EST
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This study demonstrates the effect of only simultaneous infection by B. burgdorferi and B. microti on each pathogen, immune response and on disease manifestations with respect to infection by the spirochete and the parasite. In our future studies, we will examine the overall effects of sequential infection by these pathogens on host immune responses and disease outcomes.
Source: Frontiers in Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 5 June 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Benjamin A. Tonelli, Donald C. DearbornAbstractIxodes scapularis is responsible for the transmission of a variety of pathogens in North America, including Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Babesia microti. Songbirds have previously been described as agents of tick dispersal, and a combination of empirical data and modeling efforts have implicated songbirds in the range expansion of I. scapularis northward into Canada during spring bird migration. The role of fall bird migration has received comparat...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Updated Date: May 20, 2019 EST
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In this study, we applied complementary in silico approaches to modeling how Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection modulates tick vector regulome. This proof-of-concept research provided support for the use of network analysis in the study of regulome response to infection, resulting in new information on tick-pathogen interactions and potential targets for developing interventions for the control of tick infestations and pathogen transmission. Deciphering the precise nature of circuits that shape the tick regulome in response to pathogen infection is an area of research that in the future will advance our knowledge of tick-...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
This study provides insight into the microbial diversity of I. scapularis in New York State and Connecticut.
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Abstract Climate warming and other environmental changes have contributed to the expansion of the range of several tick species into higher latitudes in North America. As temperatures increase in Canada, the environment becomes more suitable for ticks and the season suitable for tick activity lengthens, so tick-borne diseases are likely to become more common in Canada. In addition to Lyme disease, four other tick-borne diseases (TBDs) have started to emerge and are likely to increase: Anaplasmosis; Babesiosis; Powassan virus; and Borrelia miyamotoi disease. Increased temperature increases the survival and activity...
Source: Can Commun Dis Rep - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: Can Commun Dis Rep Source Type: research
Updated Date: Mar 29, 2019 EST
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Publication date: Available online 27 February 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Ellie L. Milnes, Grace Thornton, Alexandre N. Léveillé, Pauline Delnatte, John R. Barta, Dale A. Smith, Nicole NemethAbstractCervid babesiosis, caused by the protozoan hemoparasite Babesia odocoilei and transmitted by the blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis, is an emerging disease of Canadian cervids. This pathogen has not yet been described in humans. Data are lacking on the role of migratory birds in the adventitious spread of Ba. odocoilei-infected ticks, as well as on the infection status of I. scapularis in ...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Updated Date: Feb 1, 2019 EST
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