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Many heart failure patients don ’t recognize the risks of their illness

(Reuters Health) - Even though doctors think most people with heart failure have a high likelihood of requiring a heart transplant or dying from complications of their illness, a small U.S. study suggests that many patients see a much rosier picture of their future.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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UCLA HealthDr. Mario DengFINDINGSAn experimental blood test developed at UCLA that uses gene activity data from immune cells was 93 percent accurate in predicting survival rates for people with advanced heart failure who had surgery to implant mechanical circulatory support devices.BACKGROUNDMechanical circulatory support devices, such as ventricular assist devices and temporary total artificial hearts, can be surgically implanted in people with advanced heart failure to help the heart ’s pumping function.But people with advanced heart failure often also suffer from multi-organ dysfunction syndrome, which can lead to...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD One word: implementation. Increasingly, I’m convinced that the underappreciated challenges of implementation describe the ever-expanding gap between the promise of emerging technologies (sensors, AI) and their comparatively limited use in clinical care and pharmaceutical research. (Updated disclosure: I am now a VC, associated with a pharma company; views expressed, as always, are my own.) Technology Promises Disruption Of Healthcare… Let’s start with some context. Healthcare, it is universally agreed, is “broken,” and in particular, many of the advances and conveniences...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Daimler Benz AG David Shaywitz Innovation Source Type: blogs
In a recent article,1 conventional coronary artery bypass grafting surgery was associated with excellent results, like transplantation and/or left ventricular assist device implantation, although coronary artery bypass grafting surgery was only offered to a highly selected group of patients who demonstrated left ventricle myocardial viability and appropriate coronary target vessels for coronary bypass. Moreover, the patients were evaluated by a team of physicians with a large amount of experience in the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Acquired: Mechanical circulatory support: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
Adhyapak and Parachuri  have rightly focused on the most remarkable conclusion of the recent article by Kawajiri and colleagues1—that advanced heart failure is not a contraindication to conventional cardiac surgery. This conclusion gives credence to the natural instincts of many cardiologists and surgeons to address ex isting pathology before considering replacement or assist strategies. Nevertheless, routinely incorporating an expected 12% (n = 16) in-hospital mortality into one's practice carries substantial reputational risks that may offset the benefits of taking on these types of cases—particular...
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Acquired: Mechanical circulatory support: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
Despite several interventions, both pharmacologic- and device-based, for the treatment of advanced heart failure following ischemic heart disease, the incidence is increasing in large proportions, mainly targeting a patient's productive years. Several novel molecular- and device-based therapies have been developed that show promising short-term results with no long-term benefits.1 Although most randomized controlled trials yield results that are disappointing or difficult to interpret, the seemingly neutral findings of these trials promote the need for further trials.
Source: The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery - Category: Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery Authors: Tags: Acquired: Mechanical circulatory support: Letter to the editor Source Type: research
Abstract PURPOSE: In adult liver transplant recipients, coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure are significant cause of morbidity and mortality. This may be attributed to the long-term immunosuppressive treatment, mostly with calcineurin inhibitors and steroids, which in long-term may be associated with hyperlipidemia, oxidative stress and cardiovascular complications. Since such data for children is sparse, the aim of this study was to assess the lipid and oxidative stress markers after pediatric liver transplantation (LTx). METHOD: We performed prospective analysis of 74 children, at the media...
Source: Acta Biochim Pol - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Acta Biochim Pol Source Type: research
Purpose of review Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has become an indispensable tool in the management of children with impending respiratory and cardiac failure. Though extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) was classically the only form of support available to pediatric patients, considerable advances have allowed ventricular assist devices (VADs) to become increasingly utilized in children. This review provides an update of recent advances in ECMO and VAD management in children. Recent findings The options for mechanical support in infants and small children with end-stage heart failure are limited. As such,...
Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: PEDIATRIC CARDIOLOGY: Edited by Mitchell I. Cohen Source Type: research
After a myocardial infarction, heart tissue becomes irreversibly damaged, leading to scar formation and inevitably ischemic heart failure. Of the many available interventions after a myocardial infarction, such as percutaneous intervention or pharmacological optimization, none can reverse the ischemic insult on the heart and restore cardiac function. Thus, the only available cure for patients with scarred myocardium is allogeneic heart transplantation, which comes with extensive costs, risks, and complications. However, multiple studies have shown that the heart is, in fact, not an end-stage organ and that there are endoge...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
Milrinone is an invaluable agent in the treatment of end-stage heart failure patients who are refractory to optimal medical therapy. In addition to its use in acute decompensated heart failure, milrinone can also be employed as a home infusion therapy or a bridge to cardiac transplant. Concerns about its adverse effects, such as an increased risk of arrhythmias and hypotension, often limit the doses of milrinone used in clinical practice. In addition, milrinone is infrequently used or avoided entirely in patients with acute renal failure or end-stage renal disease because the drug is primarily cleared by renal excretion. D...
Source: Cardiology in Review - Category: Cardiology Tags: Review Articles Source Type: research
Heart transplantation is the gold standard for treatment of end stage heart failure. Atrial parasystole (AP), defined as the presence of an additional dissociated atrial pacemaker on a surface electrocardiogram, has been described to be seen after heart transplantation using biatrial surgical technique. AP may pose a challenge in diagnosing underlying rhythm disturbances in these patients. Here, we report a rare phenomenon of junctional escape rhythm with sinus node dysfunction, mimicking as complete atrioventricular block due to the presence of an AP, in a heart transplant recipient.
Source: Journal of Electrocardiology - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: research
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