What About Our Brains?

So cancer didn't kill us. Our cancer treatment didn't kill us. But our brains no longer function as well as they did before.At my knitting group at a cancer support center we routinely forget each other's names.... and claim chemo brain.I think there are several causes of chemo brain. The biggest and most important one is the so called'cognitive dysfunction'as a result of the lovely chemicals they pour into us during treatment. There is a lot ofinformation on this as well as the awareness (finally) of the need to do something about this.I strongly believe that another cause of chemobrain is the stress and ensuing PTSD that causes us to have lapses in our memories as well.This raises the issue that while a cancer diagnosis and treatment is harsh on our bodies and on our minds, there needs to be a concerted effort (and more research) on how to improve post treatment care and how to prevent more issues for patients.From a patient's point of view, a cancer diagnosis should not be a life changing event. I can be a life affecting event but it should not alter you forever - either emotionally or physically.There are many ailments out there without cures but then why is'cancer'the only word which is so scary? We need to take the fear out cancer and the injuries out of its treatment. This would help our brains a great deal.
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: cancer diagnosis cancer treatment chemo brain emotional toll ptsd Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Qiong-Qiong Yang, Arakkaveettil Kabeer Farha, Gowoon Kim, Khalid Gul, Ren-You Gan, Harold CorkeAbstractBackgroundCurcumin has gained increasing attention in recent years due to its biological properties and photosensitivity. Curcumin-mediated photodynamic therapy has been used in antibacterial and anticancer applications. Considering the importance and rapid advances in curcumin-mediated photodynamic treatments and its related beneficial functions, a comprehensive and up-to-date review is timely to summarize the state...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: Trends in Food Science &TechnologyAuthor(s): Saikat Sen, Raja Chakraborty, Pratap KalitaAbstractBackgroundRice (Oryza sativa L.) is the most popular staple food grain and an important source of fibre, energy, minerals, vitamins, and other biomolecules. Rice parts exhibited a number of health beneficial effect in pre-clinical/clinical studies. Rice constituents are getting popularity in preparation of pharmaceutical adjuvant, food additives and supplements.Scope &approachIn this paper, we summarized the available literature on health-promoting and therapeutic...
Source: Trends in Food Science and Technology - Category: Food Science Source Type: research
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Conclusions: Nature contact may offer a range of human health benefits. Although much evidence is already available, much remains unknown. A robust research effort, guided by a focus on key unanswered questions, has the potential to yield high-impact, consequential public health insights. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1663 Received: 26 January 2017 Revised: 12 May 2017 Accepted: 25 May 2017 Published: 31 July 2017 Address correspondence to H. Frumkin, Dept. of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington School of Public Health, Box 354695, Seattle, WA 98195-4695 USA; Telephone: 206-897-1723;...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentary Source Type: research
With the proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), 20 million Americans are at risk of losing their health care coverage. A survey, conducted by Brunswick Partners, found that “75 percent of Americans agree that the proposed changes to Medicaid in the AHCA are a bad idea. And that we should not allow 14 million Americans to become uninsured even if there is a potential to reduce Medicaid spending. These results are significant because they find majorities of Americans identifying as conservatives (55 percent), moderates (82 percent) and liberals (90 percent) are opposed to the AHCA’s Medicaid pro...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In this study we demonstrate the use of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based epigenome editing to alter cell response to inflammatory environments by repressing inflammatory cytokine cell receptors, specifically TNFR1 and IL1R1. This has applications for many inflammatory-driven diseases. It could be applied for arthritis or to therapeutic cells that are being delivered to inflammatory environments that need to be protected from inflammation." In chronic back pain, for example, slipped or herniated discs are a result of damaged tissue when inflammation causes cells to create ...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
I’m grateful to Traci Pedersen for her March 3, 2016 article “Study Finds Most Breast Cancer Patients Develop PTSD Symptoms,” and to Dr. Grohol for all his efforts to help people heal from trauma. I’d say 99% of breast cancer patients develop PTSD, even though symptoms may be repressed. It would require a remarkable childhood not to do so. First, breast cancer is an immediate life threat. At diagnosis, the brain sets off our fight-flight stress chemicals, then for a minimum of a year or more (the suspense often lasts much longer), it’s like having a gun held to your head 24 x 7. If someo...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Health-related Mental Health and Wellness Research Trauma Women's Issues Attachment Breast Cancer Negativity Bias Oncology Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Psychological Trauma Traumatic Events Source Type: blogs
This article breaks down what it means to feel stressed versus depressed. Stress will signal changes that need to be made that are specific, such as lack of sleep or unhappiness at your job, where as depression hangs around longer than little ‘spells’ like stress, and is usually triggered by something or feels like it just pops out of nowhere. http://www.beliefnet.com/wellness/health/emotional-health/depression/depressed-or-just-stressed.aspx Feeling powerless in our current world is a commonality we all share. However, some people develop real anxieties and fears based on the unpredictability of our future...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: featured health and fitness psychology self improvement anxiety best depression blogs pickthebrain Source Type: blogs
November is National Family Caregivers Month and to mark the occasion, HuffPost50 published a callout in September from our editor-at-large Rita Wilson seeking stories of inspiring caregivers. We were inundated with submissions, some from family members and some from the caregivers themselves. In this second installment of a two-part series titled Unsung Heroes: The Faces Of Caregiving In America Today, you’ll read about five of the many people across the country who put their own lives on pause to tend to friends and family members who have fallen ill. Another five caregivers were profiled last week. ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
We know Bill Clinton did not inhale but Barak Obama did inhale (because that was the whole point). I might have inhaled in the past but would never consider it now. All my past experiences involved smoking and occasional batches of brownies. One friend told me that she asked her doctor about it and he told her it wasn't appropriate for her. She thinks she could go off all her other medications if she could go to pot. Another blogger recently revealed her problems trying to determine how much marijuana was contained in cookies she purchased. Medical marijuana has been looming outside of my wheelhouse recently. I have hear...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: ailments medical marijuana medications pain relief Source Type: blogs
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